Category Archives: Bioethics

Criminology and Research Ethics: Drawing the Line in Animal Research

STUDENT VOICES

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

By: Michael S. Dauber

“In order to study blood-spatter patterns, a group of researchers in New Zealand strapped pigs to a surgical table and shot them in the head. Some of these animals were alive. Nasty, for sure, but apparently humane. The study has been justified by the government-funded Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR), one of the collaborators, because if translatable to humans, the findings might have use in solving crimes involving gunshot wounds.”[1]

Research ethics has been a hot subject in recent years, especially when it relates to experiments involving harm towards animals. Many object to the practice entirely, citing the fact that they believe killing is always wrong, the notion that our treatment of non-human animal subjects is speciesist[2] (meaning discrimination based on species), and that it is wrong to use animals for experiments that have no way to consent to research participation.

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‘Family is Family’: Why Intel’s New Adoption & Fertility Policies are a Step in the Right Direction

sperm and eggs

Via freedigitalphotos.net

By Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

This week Intel announced new job benefit policies that include tripling their adoption assistance program, and quadrupling their fertility coverage, noting, “family is family – no matter what it looks like.”

This comes after the company unveiled an expanded “family bonding leave” policy in January, which allows employees who are new parents to take up to eight weeks of paid leave, in addition to the existing pregnancy policy that provides new mothers with up to 13 weeks of paid time off. The “family bonding leave” can be taken any time within the first 12 months of a child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement.

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Stopping Pseudoscience & Protecting Children’s Lives: Fordham’s Dr. Celia B. Fisher on SAMHSA Expert Panel Behind White House Groundbreaking Conversion Therapy Report

SAMHSA

apa-logo

A report released today is a major step in President Obama’s commitment to expand the number of states enacting “Leelah’s Law,” which would ban the use of conversion therapy to change the sexual orientation or gender identity of lesbian, gay and transgender children and youth.

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education and the Marie Ward Doty Endowed Chair and Professor of Psychology served on the expert consensus panel whose recommendations form the basis of this report.

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Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses HIV Prevention & PrEP-Related Stigma

Dr. Kristen Underhill

Dr. Kristen Underhill

While an effective HIV prevention medication exists, the stigma surrounding stereotypes of the sexual promiscuity of users has undermined its preventative potential.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) Fellow Dr. Kristen Underhill, an associate research scholar at Yale University recently addressed this issue in a commentary piece in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Predatory Publishers: a $75 million-a-year business that can exacerbate health disparities

Via freedigitalphotos.net

Via freedigitalphotos.net

A  longitudinal study published yesterday indicates that predatory publishing is big business, bringing in $75 million in 2014 alone by publishing nearly half a million articles.

Researchers in Finland conducted the first comprehensive study of predatory publishers, examining the e-business aspect as well as the inadequate peer-review process. They found that predatory journals have rapidly increased their publication volumes from 53,000 in 2010 to an estimated 420,000 articles in 2014, published by around 8,000 active journals.

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‘One uterus bridging three generations of a family’: Woman who received her mother’s transplanted womb gives birth

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

The fourth baby born via a transplanted uterus isn’t just a medical success story – it bridges three generations of a family.

A woman in Sweden who lost her own uterus to cancer in her 20s has given birth to a healthy baby boy after receiving a transplanted womb donated by her mother.

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The FDA, Finances, & Feminism: Why the third time was the charm for so-called “female Viagra”

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Money can’t buy happiness, but evidently is instrumental in gaining FDA approval for controversial drugs with low efficacy and significant side effects.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Addyi (Flibanserin) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women, after denying approval in 2010 and 2013 because the risks of the medication did not outweigh the benefits.

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