Category Archives: Contemporary Ethical Issues

Asst. Director Dr. Adam Fried Takes Over as Ethics Editor for Clinical Psychology Publication

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Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried is the new editor of the ethics column of The Clinical Psychologist, a publication of the American Psychological Association (APA).

Fried’s first column on affirming ethical responsibilities, appeared in the Spring 2015, Volume 68, Issue 1 of the publication of Division 12 of the APA comprised of professional clinical psychologists.

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When are Researchers Accomplices to a Crime? Navigating Moral Boundaries

On the run cover

By: Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

In her book, On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City, sociologist Alice Goffman describes driving her passenger, “Mike,” a young man participating in her 6-year field study, looking to revenge the death of another young neighborhood man (Re: “Heralded Book on Crime Disputed” New York Times, C1, June 6, 2015). Irrespective of the legal implications of Dr. Goffman’s complicity in what might have been a felony, her honest portrayal of her own feelings of revenge and sorrow illuminates the ethical quandaries faced by researchers who immerse themselves in the lives of individuals living in crime-ridden neighborhoods. 

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What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism

Over the weekend, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Postdoctoral Fellow and Program Administrator for the Adolescent Scientific Access Project Dr. Miriam R. Arbeit graduated from Tufts University with a Ph.D. in Child Study and Human Development, and served as the student speaker for the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Doctoral Hooding Ceremony.

Entitled, “What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism,” Dr. Arbeit’s speech addressed the concept of solidarity and risk sharing, particularly in an academic context.

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What Mad Men’s Betty Draper-Francis Can Teach Us About Paternalism in Medicine

January Jones as Betty Draper-Francis on AMC's Mad Men.

January Jones as Betty Draper-Francis on AMC’s Mad Men.

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Warning: spoilers ahead.

The penultimate episode of AMC’s Mad Men provided an all-too-familiar portrayal of the paternalistic nature of medicine via the handling of Betty Draper-Francis’s diagnosis of lung cancer. While the episode takes place in 1970 and there has since been a gradual shift to a more patient-centered approach in medicine, it offers a glimpse into power imbalances in medical care that still can occur today.

When Betty’s new classmates bring her to the emergency room, the first words out of the doctor’s mouth are “Mrs. Francis, is it possible to get your husband down here?” Betty assumes it is for the purpose of driving her home, but the doctor assures her that it is, in fact, for the purpose of explaining her condition to her husband, Henry, either prior to or at the same time he discloses the diagnosis to Betty.

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Modern Family: Dr. Celia B. Fisher Discusses Ethics, Biological Parenthood & Sofia Vergara’s Frozen Embryos

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

On Thursday, April 30th, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Dr. Celia B. Fisher was interviewed by ABC 7 Eyewitness News on the ethics of the right to biological parenthood and the moral responsibility of prospective parents. These issues were raised in the context of actress Sofia Vergara’s current legal battle with her ex-fiancé regarding the future of two frozen embryos they created when they were together.

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Fordham Law Graduate Addresses Legal Ethics of ‘Better Call Saul’

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Each episode of AMC’s Breaking Bad spinoff/prequel Better Call Saul features the main character involved in some sort of murky legal and ethical situations. After noticing that other podcasts and blogs that discuss the show had not yet adequately addressed the legal ethics issues that arise in each episode, New York-based ethics lawyer and Fordham University School of Law  graduate Nicole Hyland decided to fill that void.

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Terminating therapy, Facebook policies, Incorporating spirituality and treatment of LGBT clients & More: Dr. Celia B. Fisher addresses the ethical conduct of clinical psychology

 

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Clinical psychologists can face ethical dilemmas on a daily basis as a result of the nature of their work: clients revealing confidential and sensitive information during each session. Questions such as how to ethically terminate therapy and avoid “abandoning” a client, or how best to ethically address religious and spiritual issues in psychotherapy involving LGBT clients arise regularly in practice.

In January, Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher gave a webinar on the ethical conduct of clinical psychology for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) addressing these, and other ethical issues that occur in the practice of psychology.

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