Category Archives: Contemporary Ethical Issues

‘Family is Family’: Why Intel’s New Adoption & Fertility Policies are a Step in the Right Direction

sperm and eggs


By Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

This week Intel announced new job benefit policies that include tripling their adoption assistance program, and quadrupling their fertility coverage, noting, “family is family – no matter what it looks like.”

This comes after the company unveiled an expanded “family bonding leave” policy in January, which allows employees who are new parents to take up to eight weeks of paid leave, in addition to the existing pregnancy policy that provides new mothers with up to 13 weeks of paid time off. The “family bonding leave” can be taken any time within the first 12 months of a child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement.

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher Presents Webinar on Ethics in Adolescent HIV Prevention Research: Youth and Parent Perspectives

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On October 14, 2015, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher presented a webinar for the HIV/AIDS Network Coordination (HANC) on youth and parent perspectives on ethics in adolescent HIV prevention research.

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NIH’s New Definition of “Children” Finally Gets it Right: A Welcome Change for Children’s Health Equity


By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

Under current federal research regulations, a “child” is defined as an individual younger than 21 years of age – a policy that has produced inequities in health research for youth younger than 18 years of age.

Beginning January 25th, 2016, that will change: the age of a child will be defined as an individual less than 18 years old. This is a welcome change that can begin to address the urgent need for age- and population-targeted research to avoid the use of treatments tested in young adult populations that may be unsuited for adolescents and children.

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Stopping Pseudoscience & Protecting Children’s Lives: Fordham’s Dr. Celia B. Fisher on SAMHSA Expert Panel Behind White House Groundbreaking Conversion Therapy Report



A report released today is a major step in President Obama’s commitment to expand the number of states enacting “Leelah’s Law,” which would ban the use of conversion therapy to change the sexual orientation or gender identity of lesbian, gay and transgender children and youth.

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education and the Marie Ward Doty Endowed Chair and Professor of Psychology served on the expert consensus panel whose recommendations form the basis of this report.

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Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses HIV Prevention & PrEP-Related Stigma

Dr. Kristen Underhill

Dr. Kristen Underhill

While an effective HIV prevention medication exists, the stigma surrounding stereotypes of the sexual promiscuity of users has undermined its preventative potential.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) Fellow Dr. Kristen Underhill, an associate research scholar at Yale University recently addressed this issue in a commentary piece in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Professional Boundaries in Your Backyard: The Ethics of Practice in Embedded Communities

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Developing appropriate professional boundaries with clients/patients can be one of the most challenging therapeutic tasks to negotiate, irrespective of one’s level of training or experience. But what about practitioners who are embedded in communities in ways that transcend geographic overlap, in which there may be cultural or other aspects of commonality?

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried is the editor of the ethics column of The Clinical Psychologist, a publication of the American Psychological Association (APA) and addressed that subject in his most recent column.

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The FDA, Finances, & Feminism: Why the third time was the charm for so-called “female Viagra”

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Money can’t buy happiness, but evidently is instrumental in gaining FDA approval for controversial drugs with low efficacy and significant side effects.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Addyi (Flibanserin) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women, after denying approval in 2010 and 2013 because the risks of the medication did not outweigh the benefits.

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