Category Archives: Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute

Fordham’s Dr. Celia B. Fisher on Charlie Sheen’s HIV disclosures: ‘Sex workers may not have the economic or social power to say no’

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While there has been no shortage of coverage of actor Charlie Sheen’s announcement last week that he is HIV positive, one aspect of the story has been noticeably missing: the complex power dynamic when an HIV-positive individual solicits a sex worker. For many sex workers, negotiating terms or leaving the situation may not be an option.

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‘High-Profile and HIV+’ Revives Ethical Questions

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This piece was originally published yesterday on
the Fordham News blog

By: Gina Vergel

Actor Charlie Sheen made headlines in 2011 with a number of trips to rehab, his dismissal from hit show Two and a Half Men, and a public meltdown.

Four years later, he’s back in the news, as he revealed he is HIV positive in a TODAY interview with Matt Lauer.

“It’s a hard three letters to absorb. It’s a turning point in one’s life,” the 50-year-old actor said to Lauer.

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher Presents Webinar on Ethics in Adolescent HIV Prevention Research: Youth and Parent Perspectives

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On October 14, 2015, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher presented a webinar for the HIV/AIDS Network Coordination (HANC) on youth and parent perspectives on ethics in adolescent HIV prevention research.

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Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses HIV Prevention & PrEP-Related Stigma

Dr. Kristen Underhill

Dr. Kristen Underhill

While an effective HIV prevention medication exists, the stigma surrounding stereotypes of the sexual promiscuity of users has undermined its preventative potential.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) Fellow Dr. Kristen Underhill, an associate research scholar at Yale University recently addressed this issue in a commentary piece in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Minimal risk and minimal experience: Can researchers competently navigate OHRP’s new risk categories?

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By: Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced proposed revisions to modernize federal regulations governing the protection of research participants’ rights and welfare. The newly proposed regulations have many positive features that will improve the informed consent process through transparency and stricter requirements to protect participant privacy and enhance informed consent.

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Fordham RETI Fellow Receives $100K Grant from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Photo via Clark University.

Photo via Clark University.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellow Dr. Nicole Overstreet was recently awarded a $100,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to examine the needs of those affected by intimate partner violence.

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Fordham RETI Faculty Member: Heroin Epidemic is Public Health Problem, Not Criminal Issue

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Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Faculty Member Dr. Sean Philpott-Jones recently appeared on WAMC Northeast Public Radio to discuss his experience at the recent Fordham training institute, learning from the trainees, and the resurgence of heroin use as a public health problem.

Dr. Philpott-Jones reported:

Every July I have the good fortune of spending a week at Fordham University in New York City, where I teach ethics and mentor fellows enrolled in a training program supported by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

Even though I am a senior faculty member in that program, I suspect that I learn more from my students — researchers who work with drug users, commercial sex workers and other marginalized populations — than they probably learn from me. One of the things that I learned about this week was the resurgence of heroin use that has followed in the wake of the prescription drug epidemic.

Please visit the WAMC website to read the rest of the piece.