Category Archives: Fordham University Student Voices

‘Generosity is penicillin to our culture of entitlement’: Cardinal Dolan on ethics, social justice and issues facing millennials

Cardinal Dolan (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH '14 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH '14 (right)

Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 (right)

On Thursday, June 5, 2014, Fordham University’s Center for Ethics Education Ethics and Society blog student editors Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 interviewed Timothy Cardinal Dolan, the Archbishop of New York. The 90-minute interview spanned a range of topics including political party participation, research on human and animal subjects, and how Catholic educational institutions should treat students who become pregnant, among others. He also provided background on many of the Catholic Church’s teachings and moral positions.

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Cardinal Dolan on the Ethical Questions of Our Time & Generation (Full Text of the Interview)

Cardinal Dolan (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH '14 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH '14 (right)

Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 (right)

 

On Thursday, June 5, 2014, Fordham University’s Center for Ethics Education Ethics and Society student editors Michael Menconi (FCRH ’15) and Ken Ochs (FCRH ’15) interviewed Timothy Cardinal Dolan, the Archbishop of New York. Cardinal Dolan is former President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, a member of the Board of Trustees at the Catholic University of America, past chairman of Catholic Relief Services, and he also serves on the Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelization and Pontifical Council for Social Communications in Rome. His Eminence and the editors were joined by Father Thomas Berg, a moral theologian and advisor to Cardinal Dolan, at St. Joseph’s Seminary of the Archdiocese of New York for the interview.

Ochs: Thank you once again for having us. We would like to get started with our first question. You have had a great deal of interaction and dialogue with young people, and college students, particularly Fordham students. You’ve been to our university many times since you’ve been installed as Archbishop of New York. What values—ethical values, religious values, societal values perhaps—do you believe are most important for those in our generation to hold and put into practice?

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The Value of Liberal Arts Education: Fordham Students Share Their Perspectives

 

Dean XXX and Fordham students in attendance at the April 28th conference

FCRH Deans Lenis and Parmach and Fordham students in attendance at the April 28th conference. Photo by Bruce Gilbert.

 

At a recent interdisciplinary conference hosted by the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education, a distinguished panel comprised of university presidents, academics, and the Under Secretary of Education discussed the value of liberal arts education. Each speaker made compelling arguments highlighting the importance and value of liberal arts education, including information about cost, salary, lifetime learning, the residential college campus experience, and even the history of the debate on the worth of liberal arts education.

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What can you do with a degree in ethics? Video of Careers in Ethics Panel now available.

Dr. Adam L. Fried with the other members of the Careers in Ethics Panel

Dr. Adam L. Fried with the other members of the Careers in Ethics Panel. Click on photo to watch a video of the panel discussion.

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of ethics, it is relevant and necessary in everything from medicine, business and journalism, to psychology, law, and environmental studies. Ethics is interesting to study, but what are the career options in the field?

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Fordham to Host Child Advocacy Conference

FCAF Logo

 

Every year, more than 3 million children are abused or neglected in New York State alone, with many more cases going unreported.

In line with their mission to foster awareness of child abuse, neglect, maltreatment, and bullying, the Future Child Advocates of Fordham has announced their first annual child advocacy conference, “A Call to Advocacy: The Past, Present, and Future of Child Well-Being.”

The multidisciplinary academic event featuring some of the country’s foremost experts in child abuse pediatrics and maltreatment prevention will be held at Fordham University’s Keating Hall 1st Floor Auditorium on Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 from 8:30 am – 1 pm.

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Center for Ethics Education Students Attend Award Ceremony at NY Society for Ethical Culture

Center for Ethics Education Students, and Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried

Center for Ethics Education Students, and Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried

On Thursday, April 3rd, five ethics students joined Assistant Director of the Center for Ethics Education Dr. Adam Fried in attending the Champions of Change award presentation at the New York Society for Ethical Culture. Speakers included a wide range of public officials and humanitarians: First Lady of New York Chirlane McCray, Congressman Charles Rangel, singer and activist Harry Belafonte, and New York Yankees President Randy Levine.

At the event, former mayor of New York David N. Dinkins was presented with the Dr. Phyllis Harrison-Ross Public Service Award and New York State Diversity Officer Mecca Santana was conferred the Rising Star Award. Throughout the event, musical entertainment and participants’ recollections of humorous moments with the mayor kept the entire audience captivated during the insightful evening, featuring some of New York’s most notable philanthropists and advocates of social justice.

Center for Ethics Education Hosts Careers in Ethics Panel

Are you interested in studying ethics, but have questions about future careers in the field? The Center for Ethics Education’s second annual Careers in Ethics panel will give students the opportunity to learn and ask questions about potential careers in the interdisciplinary field of ethics.

“Our exciting panel showcases the amazing achievements of our alumni from the Ethics and Society program, as well as professionals affiliated with the Ethics Center who are engaged in ethics-related careers,” said Adam Fried, Ph.D., assistant director for the Center for Ethics Education,  director of the M.A. in Ethics and Society, and interdisciplinary minor in Bioethics, and moderator of the event. “Panelists will discuss their own professional paths and explain how students can pursue careers in ethics in a wide variety of professions, including those in health care, business, law, and compliance.”

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The United States v. Marijuana: Hidden Moral Arguments in the Room?

via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol

THC, the active ingredient in marijuana via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol

By: Ken Ochs

President Obama recently stunned many physicians, members of Congress, and legal experts—as well as the general public—when he opined on marijuana usage in an interview, stating, “I don’t think it’s more dangerous than alcohol.” The fact that President Obama was asked about the drug in particular is—of course—not startling at all, as marijuana has received a great deal of legal and medical publicity throughout the past few years. But his answer itself should not have taken many by surprise either, especially if one considers the ethical issues associated with the topic of drug use, which are undergoing constant reexamination and reformulation by modern society.

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Environmental Ethics and Nature: Is All Nature Natural?

By: Michael Menconi

Dr. Gregory Kaebnick at Fordham University

Dr. Gregory Kaebnick of the Hastings Center giving a lecture at Fordham University

What exactly is nature? Is nature defined by sprawling man-made public parks at the center of the world’s largest cities, or by vast acres of vegetation in the most remote parts of the Amazon Jungle, supposedly unaltered by human action? Dr. Gregory Kaebnick of the Hastings Center addressed these questions during a Center for Ethics Education lecture in the Special Collections Room of Fordham’s Walsh Library, entitled “Humans in Nature.” Kaebnick utilizes a preservationist approach to environmental ethics in an effort to unwind the complex ethical dilemmas involved in defining the intricacies of the natural world.

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The Affordable Care Act and Distributive Justice: Is it Ethical to Exclude Undocumented Immigrants?

By Ken Ochs

Immigration reform and healthcare reform are two of the most polarizing ongoing political debates in recent American history. In the absence of federal immigration reform and in the presence of a new federal healthcare system – the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – which requires legal status to obtain health insurance, there is now opportunity for everyone’s healthcare situations to improve except those of the undocumented immigrant. What are the ethical implications of excluding this large segment of the population from the prospect of improving their healthcare situations?

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Two Moral Persons, One Court Decision

By: Michael Menconi

On November 24th, Erick Munoz discovered his 33-year-old wife, Marlise Munoz, unconscious on the floor of their Texas home. A tragic consequence of a pulmonary embolism, Marlise was rushed to John Peter Smith Hospital and declared brain dead in the emergency room. She was moved to the intensive care unit where she remained on life support for six weeks against the wish of her husband, who maintained she would not wish to live in this incapacitated condition if she were given the choice. Significantly complicating the situation and simultaneously launching the case to the forefront of national debate, however, was the fact that Marlise was 14 weeks pregnant at the time of her clinically diagnosed brain death.

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The Fallen Children: has the Christian narrative failed foster care?

By: Kate Smoot

Justice is notoriously difficult to get right.  Often, injustice prevails through simple ignorance or willful blindness.  Even the best-laid plans may go horrifically awry through inadequate attention to complex social realities. In a course entitled “Health Disparities and Social Inequalities” taught by Dr. Celia B. Fisher at Fordham University, we utilize current social research to link theoretical frameworks with careful attention to context.   In one study, “Pathways to Prison: Life Histories of Former Clients of the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems,” imprisoned adults were invited to tell their own stories, addressing their own understandings of justice, agency, and responsibility.

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Introducing Student Voices: Fordham University students’ perspectives on ethical issues

By: Student Voices Editorial Board

The Fordham University Center for Ethics Education is delighted to announce the launch of Student Voices, a new section of the Ethics & Society blog. Student Voices will serve as a space for Fordham undergraduate and graduate students to discuss, explore and analyze ethics-related current news events, scholarship, and contemporary issues within the Fordham community and beyond.

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Our Inherited Diet: Reconsidering the Reason We Eat Meat

Meat

This is the first in a series of posts by students in Fordham University’s Master of Arts in Ethics and Society program.

By: Christopher Kovel

I recently had the opportunity to attend a debate on moral perspectives between famed philosopher Peter Singer, and theologian (and Fordham’s own) Charles Camosy at the idyllic campus of Princeton University. Singer, who is a secular utilitarian, balances his ethical stances on a pain vs. pleasure scale. Reducible to the method of pleasure maximization, Singer uses this calculus to identify rectitude. Camosy, in turn, is a Catholic ethicist, who begins at God and His fundamental goodness. Amid the clash of these disparate mindsets, the two professors tended to find commonality about the gross mistreatment of animals. They both, I learned, abstain from the consumption of animal products because they find the choice morally bankrupt. As I was leaving Princeton, I remembered a recent dinner out with the family:

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