Category Archives: In the News

Dr. Celia B. Fisher appears on the Melissa Harris-Perry show on MSNBC to discuss health disparities and Ebola

CBF on MHP photo

On Saturday, October 18, Fordham Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher appeared as a guest on MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry to discuss mounting discrimination towards West African immigrants in the wake of the first death from the Ebola virus in the United States.

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Options or oppression: What do new egg freezing job benefits mean for women?

Egg storage for IVF. Apple and Facebook are to offer the perk alongside other benefits for staff. Photograph: Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Egg storage for IVF.  Photograph: Science Photo Library/Getty Images

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Ever since the news broke on Tuesday of Facebook and Apple’s new policy of including egg freezing as a job benefit for women, there has been significant discussion and controversy surrounding the strategy. While debate on issues pertaining to gender and awareness of fertility and reproductive ethics issues is always welcome, we must also consider what implications this policy will have for women; namely, whether egg freezing could be used to limit or control women’s reproductive options.

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher & Co-PI awarded $1.9 million grant to examine the ethics in HIV prevention research involving LGBT youth

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of the Center for Ethics Education

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of the Center for Ethics Education

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher and her co-PI Dr. Brian Mustanski (Northwestern University) have received a 4-year grant for $1,918,206.00 from the National Institute on Minority Health Disparities (NIMHD) on Ethics in HIV Prevention Research Involving LGBT Youth (1R01MD009561-01).

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Was it ethical for the American missionaries to be treated for Ebola ahead of Liberians? Dr. Celia B. Fisher weighs in

Players of the ”L’Etoile de Guinee” football team poses with a sign reading ”Stop to the ebola epidemic” prior to a football tournament gathering youth from Guinea near the Koumassi sports center in Abidjan on August 10, 2014. West Africa was counting the cost of measures to contain the deadly Ebola epidemic on August 10, as unprecedented restrictions caused snarled transport, food shortages and soaring prices.  Photo credit: SIA KAMBOU/AFP/Getty Images

As the world comes to terms with the recent Ebola outbreak, several ethical questions have arisen, many of which relate to the distributions of Ebola vaccines, and who should be given priority.

Was it ethical for the two American missionaries to receive treatment for Ebola ahead of the local Liberian population?

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Promotion for ethics group in the American Public Health Association

logo-apha

The Ethics Special Primary Interest Group (SPIG) of the American Public Health Association (APHA) is slated to become to an official section of the organization in July. While this may appear to be merely a structural change within an organization, the promotion of the ethics group of APHA has wider implications for the discipline.

“The transition from a SPIG to a formal Section will position public health ethics as a full participant at the multidisciplinary table,” explained Lisa Lee, Ph.D., M.S., chair of the Ethics SPIG and Executive Director of the President Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues.  “Our primary aim is to integrate ethical decision making into the fabric of public health practice so ethics is viewed as and becomes a facilitator of great work rather than an obstacle.”

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Womb transplantation: if it can be done, should it?

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives, in what was the first large-scale experiment to determine whether this procedure could someday result in pregnancy. Was this experiment ethical, and if so, should it continue?

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For the Love of Animals: Fordham Professor Examines Christian Ethics and the Treatment of Animals in New Book

For-love-of-animals

About 10 years ago, Charles Camosy decided to give up eating meat. Camosy, an assistant professor of Christian Ethics at Fordham University, believed that this change in diet was necessary in order to be authentically and consistently Christian and pro-life.

In his new book, For the Love of Animals: Christian Ethics, Consistent Action, Camosy makes the argument that Christian ethics and doctrine require the moral treatment of animals, and are therefore incompatible with the consumption of meat. Using history and scripture, Camosy discusses the roots of this Christian belief, before examining how these ideas translate into everyday life. He asks questions regarding whether Christians should eat meat, and what sort of medical research on animals can be justified, in addition to considering the ethics of pet ownership and hunting.

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