Category Archives: In the News

‘One uterus bridging three generations of a family’: Woman who received her mother’s transplanted womb gives birth

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

The fourth baby born via a transplanted uterus isn’t just a medical success story – it bridges three generations of a family.

A woman in Sweden who lost her own uterus to cancer in her 20s has given birth to a healthy baby boy after receiving a transplanted womb donated by her mother.

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The FDA, Finances, & Feminism: Why the third time was the charm for so-called “female Viagra”

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Money can’t buy happiness, but evidently is instrumental in gaining FDA approval for controversial drugs with low efficacy and significant side effects.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Addyi (Flibanserin) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women, after denying approval in 2010 and 2013 because the risks of the medication did not outweigh the benefits.

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Fordham Professor Dr. Olivia Hooker Honored by President Obama at Coast Guard Graduation

Photo by White House photographer Pete Souza

Photo by White House photographer Pete Souza

Speaking at the Coast Guard graduation in May 2015, President Barack Obama honored 100-year-old retired Fordham University Professor of Psychology Dr. Olivia Hooker, describing her as “as sharp as they come, and as fearless.”

Dr. Hooker, a lifelong civil rights activist and the first African American woman to enlist in the Coast Guard, was recently recognized in March with a Coast Guard building named in her honor on Staten Island.

For more information on Dr. Hooker, please read the Ethics & Society post on her life from March, and watch this video where she discusses Fordham, Faith, and Redemption.

 

Fit to a “T”: Addressing the Unique Needs of Transgender Students

transclassroom_trans

 

On Monday, August 3, several organizations, including the Human Rights Campaign, the National Education Association, and the American Civil Liberties Union released “Schools in Transition: A Guide for Supporting Transgender Students in K-12 Schools.” The report, which addresses issues such as names and pronouns, dress codes, and puberty and medical transition “represents an important milestone in reducing health disparities among transgender youth, something that we are also working toward at the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education,” stated Dr. Celia Fisher, Center Director.

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Fordham’s Dr. Christiana Z. Peppard at the forefront of encyclical analysis

chrisy photo

Following the Vatican’s release of Pope Francis’s first encyclical on Thursday, Fordham University Assistant Professor of Theology, Science and Ethics Christiana Z. Peppard, Ph.D., has been providing analysis and commentary on the much-awaited papal message on climate change.

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Should a UK woman be able to fertilize, implant and gestate her deceased daughter’s frozen eggs?

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

While many parents of children of childbearing age make no secret of their desire to become grandparents, one woman in the UK took her request to the High Court.

Britain’s High Court has denied the 59-year-old woman – whose daughter died in 2011 at the age of 28 – the right to use her deceased daughter’s frozen eggs after determining that it wasn’t clear that the daughter had wanted her eggs used for this purpose.

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When are Researchers Accomplices to a Crime? Navigating Moral Boundaries

On the run cover

By: Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

In her book, On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City, sociologist Alice Goffman describes driving her passenger, “Mike,” a young man participating in her 6-year field study, looking to revenge the death of another young neighborhood man (Re: “Heralded Book on Crime Disputed” New York Times, C1, June 6, 2015). Irrespective of the legal implications of Dr. Goffman’s complicity in what might have been a felony, her honest portrayal of her own feelings of revenge and sorrow illuminates the ethical quandaries faced by researchers who immerse themselves in the lives of individuals living in crime-ridden neighborhoods. 

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