Tag Archives: Bioethics

Center for Ethics Education Hosts Careers in Ethics Panel

Are you interested in studying ethics, but have questions about future careers in the field? The Center for Ethics Education’s second annual Careers in Ethics panel will give students the opportunity to learn and ask questions about potential careers in the interdisciplinary field of ethics.

“Our exciting panel showcases the amazing achievements of our alumni from the Ethics and Society program, as well as professionals affiliated with the Ethics Center who are engaged in ethics-related careers,” said Adam Fried, Ph.D., assistant director for the Center for Ethics Education,  director of the M.A. in Ethics and Society, and interdisciplinary minor in Bioethics, and moderator of the event. “Panelists will discuss their own professional paths and explain how students can pursue careers in ethics in a wide variety of professions, including those in health care, business, law, and compliance.”

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The United States v. Marijuana: Hidden Moral Arguments in the Room?

via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol

THC, the active ingredient in marijuana via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol

By: Ken Ochs

President Obama recently stunned many physicians, members of Congress, and legal experts—as well as the general public—when he opined on marijuana usage in an interview, stating, “I don’t think it’s more dangerous than alcohol.” The fact that President Obama was asked about the drug in particular is—of course—not startling at all, as marijuana has received a great deal of legal and medical publicity throughout the past few years. But his answer itself should not have taken many by surprise either, especially if one considers the ethical issues associated with the topic of drug use, which are undergoing constant reexamination and reformulation by modern society.

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Environmental Ethics and Nature: Is All Nature Natural?

By: Michael Menconi

Dr. Gregory Kaebnick at Fordham University

Dr. Gregory Kaebnick of the Hastings Center giving a lecture at Fordham University

What exactly is nature? Is nature defined by sprawling man-made public parks at the center of the world’s largest cities, or by vast acres of vegetation in the most remote parts of the Amazon Jungle, supposedly unaltered by human action? Dr. Gregory Kaebnick of the Hastings Center addressed these questions during a Center for Ethics Education lecture in the Special Collections Room of Fordham’s Walsh Library, entitled “Humans in Nature.” Kaebnick utilizes a preservationist approach to environmental ethics in an effort to unwind the complex ethical dilemmas involved in defining the intricacies of the natural world.

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Two Moral Persons, One Court Decision

By: Michael Menconi

On November 24th, Erick Munoz discovered his 33-year-old wife, Marlise Munoz, unconscious on the floor of their Texas home. A tragic consequence of a pulmonary embolism, Marlise was rushed to John Peter Smith Hospital and declared brain dead in the emergency room. She was moved to the intensive care unit where she remained on life support for six weeks against the wish of her husband, who maintained she would not wish to live in this incapacitated condition if she were given the choice. Significantly complicating the situation and simultaneously launching the case to the forefront of national debate, however, was the fact that Marlise was 14 weeks pregnant at the time of her clinically diagnosed brain death.

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Introducing Student Voices: Fordham University students’ perspectives on ethical issues

By: Student Voices Editorial Board

The Fordham University Center for Ethics Education is delighted to announce the launch of Student Voices, a new section of the Ethics & Society blog. Student Voices will serve as a space for Fordham undergraduate and graduate students to discuss, explore and analyze ethics-related current news events, scholarship, and contemporary issues within the Fordham community and beyond.

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Womb transplantation: if it can be done, should it?

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives, in what was the first large-scale experiment to determine whether this procedure could someday result in pregnancy. Was this experiment ethical, and if so, should it continue?

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Webinar: Advancing Bioethics Education

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues will hold a webinar on Advancing Bioethics Education on September 19, 2013 from 1-2 p.m. E.S.T.

The webinar will serve as an introduction to the Commission’s new education materials, developed to support the teaching of bioethics ideas, principles, and theories at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels. The webinar will review the materials and discuss their potential application in existing curricula for both traditional and nontraditional educational settings.

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Fordham University Research Ethics Training Institute Faculty Member Discusses the Ethics of HIV Cure Research

Recently, Dr. Jeremy Sugarman, Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute faculty member, discussed the ethics of HIV cure research in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

In an article published on August 13, 2013, Dr. Sugarman, Professor of Bioethics at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, contends that as HIV cure research progresses, ethical implications must be taken into consideration in order to protect the rights, interests, and welfare of all research participants involved.

Please click here for the full article.