Tag Archives: Celia B. Fisher

Was it ethical for the American missionaries to be treated for Ebola ahead of Liberians? Dr. Celia B. Fisher weighs in

Players of the ”L’Etoile de Guinee” football team poses with a sign reading ”Stop to the ebola epidemic” prior to a football tournament gathering youth from Guinea near the Koumassi sports center in Abidjan on August 10, 2014. West Africa was counting the cost of measures to contain the deadly Ebola epidemic on August 10, as unprecedented restrictions caused snarled transport, food shortages and soaring prices.  Photo credit: SIA KAMBOU/AFP/Getty Images

As the world comes to terms with the recent Ebola outbreak, several ethical questions have arisen, many of which relate to the distributions of Ebola vaccines, and who should be given priority.

Was it ethical for the two American missionaries to receive treatment for Ebola ahead of the local Liberian population?

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The Value of Liberal Arts Education: Fordham Students Share Their Perspectives

 

Dean XXX and Fordham students in attendance at the April 28th conference

FCRH Deans Lenis and Parmach and Fordham students in attendance at the April 28th conference. Photo by Bruce Gilbert.

 

At a recent interdisciplinary conference hosted by the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education, a distinguished panel comprised of university presidents, academics, and the Under Secretary of Education discussed the value of liberal arts education. Each speaker made compelling arguments highlighting the importance and value of liberal arts education, including information about cost, salary, lifetime learning, the residential college campus experience, and even the history of the debate on the worth of liberal arts education.

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Welcome to the 2014 Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows

The Fordham HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute is delighted to announce that the following individuals have been selected as the 2014 fellows:

Dr. Erin Bonar, University of Michigan

Dr. Erin Bonar, University of Michigan

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Center for Ethics Education Hosts Conference on the Value of Liberal Arts Education

The panel addresses the value of liberal arts education.

The panel addresses the value of liberal arts education. Photo by Bruce Gilbert

What is the value of a liberal arts education, and what place does it have in America’s future? An interdisciplinary conference sponsored by the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education on April 28 addressed these issues, and featured presentations from several leading liberal arts scholars, including Acting Under Secretary of Education, Jamienne Studley.

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Fordham RETI Fellows Publish in JERHRE Special Issue

RETI Cohort 1& 2 Fellows and Faculty

RETI Cohort 1& 2 Fellows and Faculty

Six Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) Fellows recently published articles in a special issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics (JERHRE). The special issue highlights recent innovative research and scholarship on ethical issues critical to the responsible conduct of HIV prevention research.

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Center for Ethics Education Hosts Careers in Ethics Panel

Are you interested in studying ethics, but have questions about future careers in the field? The Center for Ethics Education’s second annual Careers in Ethics panel will give students the opportunity to learn and ask questions about potential careers in the interdisciplinary field of ethics.

“Our exciting panel showcases the amazing achievements of our alumni from the Ethics and Society program, as well as professionals affiliated with the Ethics Center who are engaged in ethics-related careers,” said Adam Fried, Ph.D., assistant director for the Center for Ethics Education,  director of the M.A. in Ethics and Society, and interdisciplinary minor in Bioethics, and moderator of the event. “Panelists will discuss their own professional paths and explain how students can pursue careers in ethics in a wide variety of professions, including those in health care, business, law, and compliance.”

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The Fallen Children: has the Christian narrative failed foster care?

By: Kate Smoot

Justice is notoriously difficult to get right.  Often, injustice prevails through simple ignorance or willful blindness.  Even the best-laid plans may go horrifically awry through inadequate attention to complex social realities. In a course entitled “Health Disparities and Social Inequalities” taught by Dr. Celia B. Fisher at Fordham University, we utilize current social research to link theoretical frameworks with careful attention to context.   In one study, “Pathways to Prison: Life Histories of Former Clients of the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems,” imprisoned adults were invited to tell their own stories, addressing their own understandings of justice, agency, and responsibility.

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Clinical trials can & should be designed to include people with disabilities

Clinical trials tend to exclude vulnerable populations, such as people with disabilities. Speaking to Joshua Howgego of SciDev.net, Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of the Center for Ethics Education, explained that clinical trials can — and should — be designed to include people with disabilities.

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Improved Regulations to Protect Human Research Subjects Would Reduce Burden on IRBs While Better Protecting Study Participants

NAS

Proposed updates to federal regulations that protect human research subjects need additional clarification when applied to the social and behavioral sciences, says a new report from the National Research Council.  Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher was a member of the committee and an author of the report.

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HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Now Accepting Applications for 2014

2013 HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Faculty, Fellows and Staff

2013 HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Faculty, Fellows and Staff

Now in its fourth year, the Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) is now accepting applications for the 2014 Summer Institute and Mentored Research Program.

This NIDA-funded program, directed by Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, provides early career investigators in the social, behavioral, medical and public health fields with an opportunity to gain research ethics training.

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher Featured on Al Jazeera Documentary Discussing Psychological Effects & Ethics of NSA Surveillance

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, psychologist and ethics expert appeared on the Al Jazeera America program Fault Lines. Photo by Bud Glick.

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, psychologist and ethics expert appeared on the Al Jazeera America program Fault Lines. Photo by Bud Glick.

What are the psychological effects of surveillance? Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher discussed this, as well as the ethical implications of surveillance on Fault Lines, a program on Al Jazeera America.

Collect it All: America’s Surveillance State aired on Friday and Saturday nights, and will be shown internationally on Al Jazeera English on Wednesday, November 6th at 6:30 p.m. E.S.T.

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The Scientist-Citizen Dilemma and Moral Stress

Many of the ethical challenges faced by researchers conducting community-based studies with persons addicted to street drugs can be understood in terms of the “scientist-citizen dilemma.” This dilemma arises when researcher’s ethical obligation to produce scientifically valid knowledge conflicts with their sense of moral responsibility to help participants living in poverty with little access to treatment.

Frontline research staff engaged in the practical process of moral agency who encounter such dilemmas on a daily basis often experience moral stress when they cannot actualize these dual values via their work. Such stress may lead them to take actions that while assisting research participants in need jeopardize the validity of the study conducted.  In a recent article, Dr. Celia B. Fisher and her colleagues examined the consequences of moral stress among drug use community researchers and the organizational climates that can reduce or exacerbate these moral conflicts.

To read the full article, please see:

Fisher, C. B., True, G., Alexander, L., & Fried, A. L. (2013). Moral stress, moral practice, and ethical climate in community-based drug-use research: Views from the front line. AJOB Primary Research4(3), 27-38.

Can a racist grandfather raise a biracial child? ‘The Root’ asks Dr. Celia B. Fisher to weigh in

Can a racist grandfather raise a biracial child?

A reader of The Root — a website that bills itself as a source for “Black News, Opinion, Politics and Culture” — wrote in seeking advice on what to do about his father, who, along with his mother, is raising his biracial niece. While he notes that his father is a great father and grandfather, he also tends to make racist comments around his niece, which he believes she is picking up on.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher was quoted in the article, saying that negative racial stereotypes cause harm through “micro aggressions.” Fisher defines micro aggressions as “the everyday racially insulting and demeaning language and actions that white people may not be aware they are inflicting.” She is concerned that this will lead to feelings of anxiety, low self-esteem and a sense of personal inferiority that will affect the writer’s niece in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

To read the rest of the article, please click here.

To read a piece by CNN on the adoption of African American children by families in the Netherlands, please click here.

HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellow Examines HIV Testing in Appalachia

Dr. Tania Basta

Dr. Tania Basta

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Appalachia is home to more than 20 million people, yet researchers often overlook the area. Dr. Tania Basta is trying to change that.

Basta is a Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) Fellow, and is working on a mentored research project on HIV testing in rural Appalachia. She was recently honored with the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) Excellence in Abstract Submission Award for her abstract entitled “Factors influencing HIV testing among individuals living in rural Appalachia.” She will present her research at the APHA’s annual meeting in Boston in November.

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Advance Directives for Research Involving Adults with Advancing Dementia

By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

As advance directives for health care have become increasingly accepted in society, some have suggested that similar directives by those with advancing cognitive impairment can enhance substitute decision-making for research participation once an individual’s mental capacity has been compromised.

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Will Proposed Changes to Federal Regulations Impact Barriers to Research Involving Children and Adolescents?

For the first time in twenty years, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is considering changes to a portion of federal regulations governing research known as the “Common Rule” (45 CFR 46, 2009; Subpart A). At present, the proposed changes are not sufficiently sensitive to the potential impact on research involving infants, children and adolescents.

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Are the Workers Alright? Moral Distress Among Mental Health Researchers

By Adam L. Fried, Ph.D.

Psychologists and psychiatrists have devoted increased attention to their own self-care in response to high levels of stress in treating individuals with serious mental health conditions. Little attention, however, has been paid to those conducting research with these populations and the unique moral dilemmas encountered by researchers on the front lines.  This is especially true for the graduate students, research assistants, and other research staff who are out in the field or in hospitals providing research-related clinical assessments and interventions, as well as other more traditional research tasks, such as participant recruitment and enrollment, with individuals with high levels of anxiety, depression, and trauma.

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Are Psychologists Violating their Ethics Code by Conducting Death Penalty Evaluations for Defendants with Mental Disabilities?

By: Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.
@CeliaBFisher

Imagine you are a forensic psychologist asked during the sentencing phase of a capital punishment case to assess the mental status of a homeless, African American defendant convicted of murder.  Your evaluation report states that the defendant has an IQ and adaptive living score bordering on a diagnosis of intellectual disability, but the absence of educational and health records from childhood prevents you from definitively stating he fits the Supreme Court’s definition of “mental retardation” which would preclude the jury from recommending the death penalty.  Subsequently the defendant is sentenced for execution.

Would you be surprised to learn that your report may have placed you in violation of the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Code of Ethics that prohibits psychological activities that justify or defend violating human rights? Continue reading

Welcome to the 2013 HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows

The Fordham HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute is pleased to announce that the following individuals have been selected as the 2013 fellows: Dr. Stella Njuguna (Kenya Medical Research Institute of the University of California Berkeley), Dr. Nicole Overstreet (Yale University), Dr. Alexis Roth (University of California San Diego), Dr. Darpun Sachdev (HIV Vaccine Fellow, San Francisco Department of Public Health), Dr. Andrew Spieldenner (Hofstra University), and Dr. Sean Young (University of California Los Angeles). Continue reading