Tag Archives: Fordham University

Asst. Director Dr. Adam Fried Takes Over as Ethics Editor for Clinical Psychology Publication

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Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried is the new editor of the ethics column of The Clinical Psychologist, a publication of the American Psychological Association (APA).

Fried’s first column on affirming ethical responsibilities, appeared in the Spring 2015, Volume 68, Issue 1 of the publication of Division 12 of the APA comprised of professional clinical psychologists.

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Dignity, By Virtue of Bodily Requirements

Felix Gonzales Torres,

Felix Gonzales Torres, Untitled (1991).

STUDENT VOICES

By: Robert Schmaltz

“Act so that the effects of your action are compatible with the permanence of genuine human life…”

~ Hans Jonas (1984)

Human dignity refers to a kind of value that is difficult to distinguish without first recognizing something unique to the embodied human, the capacity to not only sustain life but radically proliferate a state of wellbeing and the capacity to absolutely annihilate. Humans can improve upon the excellences of physical conditions almost ceaselessly, tenderly care for the most fragile of conditions, and we can break bodies beyond comprehension. Why has some skepticism emerged from comparing the value of dignity to the function of autonomy? I uphold the view that for autonomy to have any worth, which it does, it must be preceded by the recognizable value of dignity. Ultimately, the objective value of human dignity is held in the practice of living and sustaining embodied lives.

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When are Researchers Accomplices to a Crime? Navigating Moral Boundaries

On the run cover

By: Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

In her book, On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City, sociologist Alice Goffman describes driving her passenger, “Mike,” a young man participating in her 6-year field study, looking to revenge the death of another young neighborhood man (Re: “Heralded Book on Crime Disputed” New York Times, C1, June 6, 2015). Irrespective of the legal implications of Dr. Goffman’s complicity in what might have been a felony, her honest portrayal of her own feelings of revenge and sorrow illuminates the ethical quandaries faced by researchers who immerse themselves in the lives of individuals living in crime-ridden neighborhoods. 

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What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism

Over the weekend, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Postdoctoral Fellow and Program Administrator for the Adolescent Scientific Access Project Dr. Miriam R. Arbeit graduated from Tufts University with a Ph.D. in Child Study and Human Development, and served as the student speaker for the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Doctoral Hooding Ceremony.

Entitled, “What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism,” Dr. Arbeit’s speech addressed the concept of solidarity and risk sharing, particularly in an academic context.

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Immigrant Detention, Genetic Testing, and Moral Obligations to LGBT Youth: Theories & Applications in Contemporary Ethics

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The Fordham University Center for Ethics Education is hosting a 3-day intensive cross-disciplinary graduate course entitled “Theories and Applications in Contemporary Ethics.” The course will take place next week, from May 19-21, 2015 on the Rose Hill campus.

Each day will feature two Fordham faculty members from different departments presenting on and discussing different topics in contemporary ethics. Using a team-teaching approach, this course brings together faculty from six disciplines to provide foundational knowledge about moral philosophy, moral theology, and bioethics, and features lectures and case discussion on issues of current social importance.

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Book Review: The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer

singer book

Book Review: The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015). ISBN 978-0-300-18027-5.

Reviewed by Michael S. Dauber

Peter Singer’s new book The Most Good You Can Do is the latest installment in a series of works dedicated to advancing altruism as a way of life. The book expands directly on Singer’s work in The Life You Can Save (2010), a best-selling text that argued that our obligation to help the poor overseas is just as strong as the obligation to save a drowning child one comes across in a river: if one can easily help, one is required to, and distance and nationality are not excuses to withhold aid.

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Modern Family: Dr. Celia B. Fisher Discusses Ethics, Biological Parenthood & Sofia Vergara’s Frozen Embryos

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

On Thursday, April 30th, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Dr. Celia B. Fisher was interviewed by ABC 7 Eyewitness News on the ethics of the right to biological parenthood and the moral responsibility of prospective parents. These issues were raised in the context of actress Sofia Vergara’s current legal battle with her ex-fiancé regarding the future of two frozen embryos they created when they were together.

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