Tag Archives: Fordham University

Faculty Voices Against Hate Speech on College Campuses

In light of recent events on college campuses across the country, we are reminded of the seminar organized three years ago by the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education where members of faculty offered their perspectives on hate speech on college campuses. This seminar focused on faculty responsibilities toward students, especially those who face systemic discrimination, to acknowledge and address their experiences of marginalization on campus and to support and facilitate open discussion about these themes, both in and outside of the classroom.

Watch the video from the Fordham faculty discussion here

Students at Fordham are encouraged to make your voice be heard, and join in the national discussion on creating equitable and inclusive university environments. Please consider submitting your thoughts on these recent events to Ethics & Society, particularly in the context of social justice, cura personalis, and ethical obligations to fellow students and other members of the university community.

Fordham University students, faculty and staff are also invited to attend a seminar next week exploring faculty responsibilities towards students in distress. It will take place on Wednesday, November 18th from 12:00 – 1:15 p.m. in Keating 124 on the Rose Hill Campus. Please read the blog post on the event for more information, including how to RSVP.

‘Family is Family’: Why Intel’s New Adoption & Fertility Policies are a Step in the Right Direction

sperm and eggs

Via freedigitalphotos.net

By Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

This week Intel announced new job benefit policies that include tripling their adoption assistance program, and quadrupling their fertility coverage, noting, “family is family – no matter what it looks like.”

This comes after the company unveiled an expanded “family bonding leave” policy in January, which allows employees who are new parents to take up to eight weeks of paid leave, in addition to the existing pregnancy policy that provides new mothers with up to 13 weeks of paid time off. The “family bonding leave” can be taken any time within the first 12 months of a child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement.

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher Presents Webinar on Ethics in Adolescent HIV Prevention Research: Youth and Parent Perspectives

Screenshot 2015-10-21 12.18.53

On October 14, 2015, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher presented a webinar for the HIV/AIDS Network Coordination (HANC) on youth and parent perspectives on ethics in adolescent HIV prevention research.

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NIH’s New Definition of “Children” Finally Gets it Right: A Welcome Change for Children’s Health Equity


By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

Under current federal research regulations, a “child” is defined as an individual younger than 21 years of age – a policy that has produced inequities in health research for youth younger than 18 years of age.

Beginning January 25th, 2016, that will change: the age of a child will be defined as an individual less than 18 years old. This is a welcome change that can begin to address the urgent need for age- and population-targeted research to avoid the use of treatments tested in young adult populations that may be unsuited for adolescents and children.

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Justice for College Roommates: A Lighthearted Approach to a Complex Principle

Via freedigitalphotos.net

Via freedigitalphotos.net


By: Brendan Dagher

Everyday we struggle to resolve how to treat those who wrong us or cause us pain. How do we punish those who steal from us? Who determines how we are fully compensated for the pain others inflict on us? We demand justice, or a system of fairness that safeguards our dignity as humans. Our personal morals feed into this system of fairness, often making justice a complex ethical issue.

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Predatory Publishers: a $75 million-a-year business that can exacerbate health disparities

Via freedigitalphotos.net

Via freedigitalphotos.net

A  longitudinal study published yesterday indicates that predatory publishing is big business, bringing in $75 million in 2014 alone by publishing nearly half a million articles.

Researchers in Finland conducted the first comprehensive study of predatory publishers, examining the e-business aspect as well as the inadequate peer-review process. They found that predatory journals have rapidly increased their publication volumes from 53,000 in 2010 to an estimated 420,000 articles in 2014, published by around 8,000 active journals.

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Unethical Teaching: How Perceptions of the Poor Negatively Shape Outcomes and Why Assumptions of Race and Class Must be Challenged

Photo via http://www.catholiceducation.org/

Dorothy Day                    Photo via http://www.catholiceducation.org/


By: Halina Shatravka

This winter I decided to volunteer at an organization I saw listed in Fordham’s Dorothy Day Center newsletter teaching inner-city, public-high school kids. Great, I thought — I went to a New York City public school, so I know a bit about these kids and the backgrounds they tend to have.

I attended a day-long orientation in a high-rise, Times Square building with carefully-selected minimalist decor. Most of the students in attendance were from other private institutions. Briefly, we went over what they deemed to be”safe” and “accessible” words to use with these students, who, it was implied, might not understand a certain vocabulary.

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