Tag Archives: Fordham University

Confidentiality and Disclosure Dilemmas in Psychotherapy with Adolescents

Dr. Adam Fried

Dr. Adam Fried

Psychologists who provide mental health services to adolescents and their families must navigate complex ethical challenges with respect to confidentiality and disclosure decision-making.

How do mental health clinicians develop confidentiality policies that serve to protect minors from serious harm, fulfill professional and legal responsibilities, and preserve the therapeutic relationship with the adolescent and parents/ guardians?

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In Good Conscience: Human Rights in an Age of Terrorism, Violence, and Limited Resources

Pervasive fears sparked by acts of terror, violent crime and resource scarcity test our values and raise critical questions about how enduring our support for human rights may be.

When does the right to live safely and securely trump our obligation to uphold basic human rights? Is our attitude toward extreme remedies such as capital punishment and torture rooted in principle or in pragmatism? What do we owe survivors of genocide and other tragedies?

Join us for a forum on the challenge of upholding human rights, compassion and justice in an increasingly insecure world, April 5th, 2016, 6 – 8 p.m., Fordham Law School.

Admission is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to crcevent@fordham.edu, or call 212-636-7347. For more information, please visit the conference website.

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My Fair Trade Journey: Evaluating Personal Responsibility and Consumerism

Fair Trade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE FIRST-PLACE WINNER 

By: Tiffany Melillo

Every day, regardless of what I do, I use forced labor.

No, I am not a plantation owner in the South during the Civil War, nor am I a current factory owner in Asia. Rather, I am a 21-year-old Fordham student from the Bronx. I grew up in a loving, middle-class family with happily married parents, a brother, and a cat. I do not fit the stereotype of someone who uses forced labor, but I assure you that I do.

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Recommendations and Resources Exploring Faculty Responsibilities Toward Students in Distress

students in distress

On November 18, 2015, the Center for Ethics Education and the Institutional Equity and Compliance Office hosted discussion with Fordham faculty and teaching fellows entitled “Exploring Faculty Responsibilities Toward Students in Distress.” This seminar featured brief presentations by Fordham faculty from different departments and an illuminating discussion about experiences, challenges, and opportunities for faculty encountering students in distress.

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Ethics & Society 2015 Year in Review

Starting with a national discussion on vaccinations, public health and autonomy, and ending with widespread reflection on yet another mass shooting, 2015 had no shortage of ethics-related news and events.

Here are a few highlights of the work of Fordham University Center for Ethics Education faculty, staff, and students from 2015:

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Contributes to National Discussion on Ethical Review & Oversight Issues in Standard of Care Research

Common clinical practices might lack a robust evidence base if there have not been empirical interventional research studies to compare an array of available routine or standard treatment options. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, an internationally renowned expert on empirical research on research ethics, recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in an Institute of Medicine (IOM) workshop aimed to inform practice and policy of regulated research studies involving standard of care interventions. Read more here.

 

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Criminology and Research Ethics: Drawing the Line in Animal Research

STUDENT VOICES

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

By: Michael S. Dauber

“In order to study blood-spatter patterns, a group of researchers in New Zealand strapped pigs to a surgical table and shot them in the head. Some of these animals were alive. Nasty, for sure, but apparently humane. The study has been justified by the government-funded Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR), one of the collaborators, because if translatable to humans, the findings might have use in solving crimes involving gunshot wounds.”[1]

Research ethics has been a hot subject in recent years, especially when it relates to experiments involving harm towards animals. Many object to the practice entirely, citing the fact that they believe killing is always wrong, the notion that our treatment of non-human animal subjects is speciesist[2] (meaning discrimination based on species), and that it is wrong to use animals for experiments that have no way to consent to research participation.

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Faculty Voices Against Hate Speech on College Campuses

In light of recent events on college campuses across the country, we are reminded of the seminar organized three years ago by the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education where members of faculty offered their perspectives on hate speech on college campuses. This seminar focused on faculty responsibilities toward students, especially those who face systemic discrimination, to acknowledge and address their experiences of marginalization on campus and to support and facilitate open discussion about these themes, both in and outside of the classroom.

Watch the video from the Fordham faculty discussion here

Students at Fordham are encouraged to make your voice be heard, and join in the national discussion on creating equitable and inclusive university environments. Please consider submitting your thoughts on these recent events to Ethics & Society, particularly in the context of social justice, cura personalis, and ethical obligations to fellow students and other members of the university community.

Fordham University students, faculty and staff are also invited to attend a seminar next week exploring faculty responsibilities towards students in distress. It will take place on Wednesday, November 18th from 12:00 – 1:15 p.m. in Keating 124 on the Rose Hill Campus. Please read the blog post on the event for more information, including how to RSVP.