Tag Archives: Fordham University

What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism

Over the weekend, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Postdoctoral Fellow and Program Administrator for the Adolescent Scientific Access Project Dr. Miriam R. Arbeit graduated from Tufts University with a Ph.D. in Child Study and Human Development, and served as the student speaker for the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Doctoral Hooding Ceremony.

Entitled, “What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism,” Dr. Arbeit’s speech addressed the concept of solidarity and risk sharing, particularly in an academic context.

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Immigrant Detention, Genetic Testing, and Moral Obligations to LGBT Youth: Theories & Applications in Contemporary Ethics

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The Fordham University Center for Ethics Education is hosting a 3-day intensive cross-disciplinary graduate course entitled “Theories and Applications in Contemporary Ethics.” The course will take place next week, from May 19-21, 2015 on the Rose Hill campus.

Each day will feature two Fordham faculty members from different departments presenting on and discussing different topics in contemporary ethics. Using a team-teaching approach, this course brings together faculty from six disciplines to provide foundational knowledge about moral philosophy, moral theology, and bioethics, and features lectures and case discussion on issues of current social importance.

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Book Review: The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer

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Book Review: The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015). ISBN 978-0-300-18027-5.

Reviewed by Michael S. Dauber

Peter Singer’s new book The Most Good You Can Do is the latest installment in a series of works dedicated to advancing altruism as a way of life. The book expands directly on Singer’s work in The Life You Can Save (2010), a best-selling text that argued that our obligation to help the poor overseas is just as strong as the obligation to save a drowning child one comes across in a river: if one can easily help, one is required to, and distance and nationality are not excuses to withhold aid.

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Modern Family: Dr. Celia B. Fisher Discusses Ethics, Biological Parenthood & Sofia Vergara’s Frozen Embryos

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

On Thursday, April 30th, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Dr. Celia B. Fisher was interviewed by ABC 7 Eyewitness News on the ethics of the right to biological parenthood and the moral responsibility of prospective parents. These issues were raised in the context of actress Sofia Vergara’s current legal battle with her ex-fiancé regarding the future of two frozen embryos they created when they were together.

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The Significance of Philosophical Ethics in a Scientific World

 STUDENT VOICES

By: Michael S. Dauber

In the course of my studies and in my everyday experiences, I have often been asked about the significance of philosophy. What is it? Does philosophy even matter anymore since science answers many of our pressing questions?

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Perspectives on Moral Worth: What We Owe to Others and Why

Joseph Vukov (left) discusses perspectives on moral worth on April 15, 2015

Joseph Vukov (left) discusses perspectives on moral worth on April 15, 2015

Many ethical questions require us to carefully consider the meanings of personhood and moral worth, in order to determine what we owe to others, and why. Fordham University Department of Philosophy Ph.D. Candidate and Research Fellow Joseph Vukov addressed this question at a Center for Ethics Education Faculty Seminar on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 in Keating Hall on Fordham’s Rose Hill Campus.

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Is the moratorium on editing the human genome ethically justifiable?

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Last month, leading scientists called for a worldwide moratorium on the use of new technologies that would enable editing of the human genome. If put into practice, this technique has the ability to alter human DNA that is inherited, thereby changing the human germline and potentially controlling human heredity.

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