Tag Archives: Fordham University

Dr. Celia B. Fisher to give webinar on the ethical conduct of clinical psychology

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher’s widely-cited book on the APA Ethics Code.

Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) CE Webinar
Friday, January 30, 2015
11am – 12:30pm EST / 10 – 11:30am CST / 9 – 10:30 am MST / 8 – 9:30am PST

1.5 CE credits ($30 members/$45 nonmembers)

Title:  Doing Good Well: The Ethical Conduct of Clinical Psychology

Level: Intermediate (working knowledge of topic area e.g., treated a few cases)

Presenter and Affiliation: Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D., Marie Ward Doty University Endowed Chair, Professor of Psychology, Director of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education, Fordham University

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Buy Buy Baby? The Ethics of Crowdfunding Babies

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By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Between adoption and advancing reproductive technologies, there are ever-increasing options for individuals and families who wish to have a baby. Recent reports indicate that the high costs associated with these processes have resulted in some using crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter.com and GoFundMe.com to raise money for fees associated with adoption, surrogacy, and assisted reproductive techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Indeed, certain forms of assisted reproduction raise ethical questions in and of themselves, but in this case, our concern is whether it matters how funds for these processes are raised, and who provides the funding. In other words, is utilizing a crowdfunding website an ethically acceptable way to raise funds for adoption, IVF, and surrogacy? If so, is it significant who pays for these processes? Is anything owed to the people who contribute?

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Dr. Celia B. Fisher Contributes to National Discussion on Ethical Review & Oversight Issues in Standard of Care Research

Common clinical practices might lack a robust evidence base if there have not been empirical interventional research studies to compare an array of available routine or standard treatment options. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, an internationally renowned expert on empirical research on research ethics, recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in an Institute of Medicine (IOM) workshop aimed to inform practice and policy of regulated research studies involving standard of care interventions.

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Implications of Common Rule Changes for Minimal Risk and Expedited Review of Social & Behavioral Research

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For the first time in 20 years the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has proposed changes to Federal Regulations governing protections for people who participate in research.  Any changes will have a substantial impact on the conduct and Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval of social-behavioral research–especially in terms of how IRBs will interpret criteria for “minimal risk” research and expedited review.

At the recent 2014 PRIM&R Advancing Ethical Research conference, Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of Fordham’s Center for Ethics Education and a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Revisions to the Common Rule for Social & Behavioral Science, explained the Committee’s recommendations for regulatory change and its impact on SBR and research involving children and other “vulnerable” populations. Dr. Fisher’s PRIM&R presentation is available for download here.

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Dr. Elizabeth Yuko appointed to international bioethics advisory board

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Fordham University Center for Ethics Education bioethicist Dr. Elizabeth Yuko has been appointed to the Advisory Board of the Global Bioethics Initiative (GBI), an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to improving quality of life in vulnerable populations globally, through research, education and policy change recommendations.

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The ethics of panhandling children: deciding whether to give

Last week, NBC reported on the increasing use of babies and children by adults panhandling in New York City. The particular group of 9 women investigated appeared to be working in tandem, and are reportedly not homeless and have repeatedly refused shelter and services.

Residents of New York and other cities where this is occurring are faced with the daily decision of whether or not to give money to those who ask for it. What are the ethical implications of making contributions?

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Separation of Church and the Voting Booth? The Moral Dilemmas of a Catholic American Voter

 

By: Thomas Merante

With each election, Americans are reminded repeatedly of their civic duty to participate, the importance of “rocking the vote,” and how each party will get the country “back on track.” Yet with MTV ads screaming at teenagers to go to the polls and attack ads that aim purely at candidates’ character, it seems that the real issues are becoming lost in an election frenzy. Consequently, it can be very difficult to determine how to vote, especially when there are serious moral issues on the line, despite a constant news stream of information on the candidates, their positions, and public opinion on the positions. What moral questions should Catholic Americans ask when contemplating contemporary political issues, and what ethical dilemmas do they face in the voting booth?

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