Tag Archives: Psychology

Unique program at Fordham examines social issues; seeks to add to renowned faculty

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The Applied Developmental Psychology doctoral program at Fordham University takes a unique, multidisciplinary approach to the study of social issues. The Fordham program has introduced three new specialities: Families, Schools, and Society; Race, Ethnicity, and Culture; and Health, Illness, and Well-Being; all of which recognize the increasing need for multidisciplinary perspectives on health promotion research and interventions across the lifespan.

The program aims to increase understanding of developmental processes, including health, academic, cognitive, social, and emotional outcomes over time. To accomplish this, they are adding to their renowned faculty a position that is open to experienced scientists in public health, education and biopsychology. To learn more about the program, please visit the Fordham ADP website. For the announcement for the new position and information on how to apply, please see the ad listing.

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Featured on Al Jazeera Documentary Discussing Psychological Effects & Ethics of NSA Surveillance

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, psychologist and ethics expert appeared on the Al Jazeera America program Fault Lines. Photo by Bud Glick.

Dr. Celia B. Fisher, psychologist and ethics expert appeared on the Al Jazeera America program Fault Lines. Photo by Bud Glick.

What are the psychological effects of surveillance? Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher discussed this, as well as the ethical implications of surveillance on Fault Lines, a program on Al Jazeera America.

Collect it All: America’s Surveillance State aired on Friday and Saturday nights, and will be shown internationally on Al Jazeera English on Wednesday, November 6th at 6:30 p.m. E.S.T.

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Using Your Moral Compass to Navigate the College Experience

On August 26, 2013, Dr. Adam Fried, Assistant Director of the Center for Ethics Education, gave the following address at the Academic Convocation for the Fordham College at Rose Hill Class of 2017. Dr. Fried was asked to speak on behalf of all members of faculty, and to welcome the new class to the Fordham University academic community. In case you were unable to attend, here is a transcript of the address:

Using Your Moral Compass to Navigate the College Experience

By: Adam Fried, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Center for Ethics Education

Thank you, Dean Parmach.  Welcome students!  I’m so honored and excited to have an opportunity to speak with you today.

First, let me tell you a little about what I do.  I’m the assistant director of the Fordham Center for Ethics Education.  We organize conferences and lectures, conduct research, administer an undergraduate essay prize in ethics, and offer a Master’s in Ethics and Society and an undergraduate interdisciplinary minor in bioethics. Our programs provide the Fordham community and the public with the knowledge and skills to shape a just society. At Fordham, I teach and my work centers on ethics.  But I am also a clinical psychologist and I have worked with veterans, college students and at-risk children and adolescents.  Although these two areas, ethics and psychology, may seem quite different, there is in fact a great deal of overlap.

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Are the Workers Alright? Moral Distress Among Mental Health Researchers

By Adam L. Fried, Ph.D.

Psychologists and psychiatrists have devoted increased attention to their own self-care in response to high levels of stress in treating individuals with serious mental health conditions. Little attention, however, has been paid to those conducting research with these populations and the unique moral dilemmas encountered by researchers on the front lines.  This is especially true for the graduate students, research assistants, and other research staff who are out in the field or in hospitals providing research-related clinical assessments and interventions, as well as other more traditional research tasks, such as participant recruitment and enrollment, with individuals with high levels of anxiety, depression, and trauma.

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