Tag Archives: Research Ethics

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: January 22, 2016

Newsfeed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Record 30,000 Organ Transplants Performed Last Year
Doctors attribute the 5% increase in donations in 2015 to Americans’ growing willingness to donate organs.

Why We Need to Rethink HIV Attitudes
Robert Klitzman argues it is time to re-examine attitudes and laws criminalizing potential HIV exposure.

Advancing Medical Professionalism in US Military Detainee Treatment
A bioethical argument that current medical ethics standards provide a sound basis for military medical practice, even in situations where military missions must be reconciled with patient needs.

Continue reading

Ethics & Society 2015 Year in Review

Starting with a national discussion on vaccinations, public health and autonomy, and ending with widespread reflection on yet another mass shooting, 2015 had no shortage of ethics-related news and events.

Here are a few highlights of the work of Fordham University Center for Ethics Education faculty, staff, and students from 2015:

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Contributes to National Discussion on Ethical Review & Oversight Issues in Standard of Care Research

Common clinical practices might lack a robust evidence base if there have not been empirical interventional research studies to compare an array of available routine or standard treatment options. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, an internationally renowned expert on empirical research on research ethics, recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in an Institute of Medicine (IOM) workshop aimed to inform practice and policy of regulated research studies involving standard of care interventions. Read more here.

 

Continue reading

Fordham RETI Fellows Present at PRIM&R Annual Meeting

Dr. Erin Bonar, Dr. Faith Fletcher, and Dr. Celia B. Fisher at the PRIM&R Annual Meeting 2015. Photo courtesy Sue Fish

Dr. Erin Bonar, Dr. Faith Fletcher, and Dr. Celia B. Fisher at the PRIM&R Annual Meeting 2015. Photo courtesy Dr. Sue Fish

The Fordham HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) was well-represented at the Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) Annual Meeting in Boston, November 12-15, with faculty and fellows presenting on their institute-funded research.

Continue reading

Voices in HIV Research: How the Fordham Research Ethics Training Institute Shapes the Next Generation of Leaders

RETI logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the major strengths of the Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute is the encouragement of studies highlighting the various voices in HIV research, including those of the patients, participants, physicians, researchers, and communities.

It is important — on World AIDS Day in particular — to reflect on the work that has been done on HIV prevention, as well as the areas, populations, and co-morbidities that are still in need of research attention.

Continue reading

Criminology and Research Ethics: Drawing the Line in Animal Research

STUDENT VOICES

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

By: Michael S. Dauber

“In order to study blood-spatter patterns, a group of researchers in New Zealand strapped pigs to a surgical table and shot them in the head. Some of these animals were alive. Nasty, for sure, but apparently humane. The study has been justified by the government-funded Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR), one of the collaborators, because if translatable to humans, the findings might have use in solving crimes involving gunshot wounds.”[1]

Research ethics has been a hot subject in recent years, especially when it relates to experiments involving harm towards animals. Many object to the practice entirely, citing the fact that they believe killing is always wrong, the notion that our treatment of non-human animal subjects is speciesist[2] (meaning discrimination based on species), and that it is wrong to use animals for experiments that have no way to consent to research participation.

Continue reading

‘High-Profile and HIV+’ Revives Ethical Questions

Screenshot 2015-11-18 10.16.08

This piece was originally published yesterday on
the Fordham News blog

By: Gina Vergel

Actor Charlie Sheen made headlines in 2011 with a number of trips to rehab, his dismissal from hit show Two and a Half Men, and a public meltdown.

Four years later, he’s back in the news, as he revealed he is HIV positive in a TODAY interview with Matt Lauer.

“It’s a hard three letters to absorb. It’s a turning point in one’s life,” the 50-year-old actor said to Lauer.

Continue reading

NIH’s New Definition of “Children” Finally Gets it Right: A Welcome Change for Children’s Health Equity

NIH_Logo

By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

Under current federal research regulations, a “child” is defined as an individual younger than 21 years of age – a policy that has produced inequities in health research for youth younger than 18 years of age.

Beginning January 25th, 2016, that will change: the age of a child will be defined as an individual less than 18 years old. This is a welcome change that can begin to address the urgent need for age- and population-targeted research to avoid the use of treatments tested in young adult populations that may be unsuited for adolescents and children.

Continue reading