Tag Archives: Social Justice

Separation of Church and the Voting Booth? The Moral Dilemmas of a Catholic American Voter

 

By: Thomas Merante

With each election, Americans are reminded repeatedly of their civic duty to participate, the importance of “rocking the vote,” and how each party will get the country “back on track.” Yet with MTV ads screaming at teenagers to go to the polls and attack ads that aim purely at candidates’ character, it seems that the real issues are becoming lost in an election frenzy. Consequently, it can be very difficult to determine how to vote, especially when there are serious moral issues on the line, despite a constant news stream of information on the candidates, their positions, and public opinion on the positions. What moral questions should Catholic Americans ask when contemplating contemporary political issues, and what ethical dilemmas do they face in the voting booth?

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‘Generosity is penicillin to our culture of entitlement’: Cardinal Dolan on ethics, social justice and issues facing millennials

Cardinal Dolan (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH '14 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH '14 (right)

Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 (right)

On Thursday, June 5, 2014, Fordham University’s Center for Ethics Education Ethics and Society blog student editors Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 interviewed Timothy Cardinal Dolan, the Archbishop of New York. The 90-minute interview spanned a range of topics including political party participation, research on human and animal subjects, and how Catholic educational institutions should treat students who become pregnant, among others. He also provided background on many of the Catholic Church’s teachings and moral positions.

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Cardinal Dolan on the Ethical Questions of Our Time & Generation (Full Text of the Interview)

Cardinal Dolan (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH '14 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH '14 (right)

Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 (right)

 

On Thursday, June 5, 2014, Fordham University’s Center for Ethics Education Ethics and Society student editors Michael Menconi (FCRH ’15) and Ken Ochs (FCRH ’15) interviewed Timothy Cardinal Dolan, the Archbishop of New York. Cardinal Dolan is former President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, a member of the Board of Trustees at the Catholic University of America, past chairman of Catholic Relief Services, and he also serves on the Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelization and Pontifical Council for Social Communications in Rome. His Eminence and the editors were joined by Father Thomas Berg, a moral theologian and advisor to Cardinal Dolan, at St. Joseph’s Seminary of the Archdiocese of New York for the interview.

Ochs: Thank you once again for having us. We would like to get started with our first question. You have had a great deal of interaction and dialogue with young people, and college students, particularly Fordham students. You’ve been to our university many times since you’ve been installed as Archbishop of New York. What values—ethical values, religious values, societal values perhaps—do you believe are most important for those in our generation to hold and put into practice?

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Fordham to Host Child Advocacy Conference

FCAF Logo

 

Every year, more than 3 million children are abused or neglected in New York State alone, with many more cases going unreported.

In line with their mission to foster awareness of child abuse, neglect, maltreatment, and bullying, the Future Child Advocates of Fordham has announced their first annual child advocacy conference, “A Call to Advocacy: The Past, Present, and Future of Child Well-Being.”

The multidisciplinary academic event featuring some of the country’s foremost experts in child abuse pediatrics and maltreatment prevention will be held at Fordham University’s Keating Hall 1st Floor Auditorium on Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 from 8:30 am – 1 pm.

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Center for Ethics Education Students Attend Award Ceremony at NY Society for Ethical Culture

Center for Ethics Education Students, and Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried

Center for Ethics Education Students, and Assistant Director Dr. Adam Fried

On Thursday, April 3rd, five ethics students joined Assistant Director of the Center for Ethics Education Dr. Adam Fried in attending the Champions of Change award presentation at the New York Society for Ethical Culture. Speakers included a wide range of public officials and humanitarians: First Lady of New York Chirlane McCray, Congressman Charles Rangel, singer and activist Harry Belafonte, and New York Yankees President Randy Levine.

At the event, former mayor of New York David N. Dinkins was presented with the Dr. Phyllis Harrison-Ross Public Service Award and New York State Diversity Officer Mecca Santana was conferred the Rising Star Award. Throughout the event, musical entertainment and participants’ recollections of humorous moments with the mayor kept the entire audience captivated during the insightful evening, featuring some of New York’s most notable philanthropists and advocates of social justice.

The Affordable Care Act and Distributive Justice: Is it Ethical to Exclude Undocumented Immigrants?

By Ken Ochs

Immigration reform and healthcare reform are two of the most polarizing ongoing political debates in recent American history. In the absence of federal immigration reform and in the presence of a new federal healthcare system – the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – which requires legal status to obtain health insurance, there is now opportunity for everyone’s healthcare situations to improve except those of the undocumented immigrant. What are the ethical implications of excluding this large segment of the population from the prospect of improving their healthcare situations?

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The Fallen Children: has the Christian narrative failed foster care?

By: Kate Smoot

Justice is notoriously difficult to get right.  Often, injustice prevails through simple ignorance or willful blindness.  Even the best-laid plans may go horrifically awry through inadequate attention to complex social realities. In a course entitled “Health Disparities and Social Inequalities” taught by Dr. Celia B. Fisher at Fordham University, we utilize current social research to link theoretical frameworks with careful attention to context.   In one study, “Pathways to Prison: Life Histories of Former Clients of the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems,” imprisoned adults were invited to tell their own stories, addressing their own understandings of justice, agency, and responsibility.

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