Tag Archives: Social Justice

My Fair Trade Journey: Evaluating Personal Responsibility and Consumerism

Fair Trade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE FIRST-PLACE WINNER 

By: Tiffany Melillo

Every day, regardless of what I do, I use forced labor.

No, I am not a plantation owner in the South during the Civil War, nor am I a current factory owner in Asia. Rather, I am a 21-year-old Fordham student from the Bronx. I grew up in a loving, middle-class family with happily married parents, a brother, and a cat. I do not fit the stereotype of someone who uses forced labor, but I assure you that I do.

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Ethics & Society 2015 Year in Review

Starting with a national discussion on vaccinations, public health and autonomy, and ending with widespread reflection on yet another mass shooting, 2015 had no shortage of ethics-related news and events.

Here are a few highlights of the work of Fordham University Center for Ethics Education faculty, staff, and students from 2015:

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Contributes to National Discussion on Ethical Review & Oversight Issues in Standard of Care Research

Common clinical practices might lack a robust evidence base if there have not been empirical interventional research studies to compare an array of available routine or standard treatment options. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, an internationally renowned expert on empirical research on research ethics, recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in an Institute of Medicine (IOM) workshop aimed to inform practice and policy of regulated research studies involving standard of care interventions. Read more here.

 

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Faculty Voices Against Hate Speech on College Campuses

In light of recent events on college campuses across the country, we are reminded of the seminar organized three years ago by the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education where members of faculty offered their perspectives on hate speech on college campuses. This seminar focused on faculty responsibilities toward students, especially those who face systemic discrimination, to acknowledge and address their experiences of marginalization on campus and to support and facilitate open discussion about these themes, both in and outside of the classroom.

Watch the video from the Fordham faculty discussion here

Students at Fordham are encouraged to make your voice be heard, and join in the national discussion on creating equitable and inclusive university environments. Please consider submitting your thoughts on these recent events to Ethics & Society, particularly in the context of social justice, cura personalis, and ethical obligations to fellow students and other members of the university community.

Fordham University students, faculty and staff are also invited to attend a seminar next week exploring faculty responsibilities towards students in distress. It will take place on Wednesday, November 18th from 12:00 – 1:15 p.m. in Keating 124 on the Rose Hill Campus. Please read the blog post on the event for more information, including how to RSVP.

Unethical Teaching: How Perceptions of the Poor Negatively Shape Outcomes and Why Assumptions of Race and Class Must be Challenged

Photo via http://www.catholiceducation.org/

Dorothy Day                    Photo via http://www.catholiceducation.org/

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE 2nd PLACE WINNER

By: Halina Shatravka

This winter I decided to volunteer at an organization I saw listed in Fordham’s Dorothy Day Center newsletter teaching inner-city, public-high school kids. Great, I thought — I went to a New York City public school, so I know a bit about these kids and the backgrounds they tend to have.

I attended a day-long orientation in a high-rise, Times Square building with carefully-selected minimalist decor. Most of the students in attendance were from other private institutions. Briefly, we went over what they deemed to be”safe” and “accessible” words to use with these students, who, it was implied, might not understand a certain vocabulary.

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‘Generosity is penicillin to our culture of entitlement’: Cardinal Dolan on ethics, social justice and issues facing millennials

Cardinal Dolan (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH '14 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH '14 (right)

Cardinal Dolan (center) with Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 (left) and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 (right)

Pope Francis’ visit to the United States, and specifically, New York, seemed like an appropriate time to revisit an interview with Timothy Cardinal Dolan, the Archbishop of New York. Two recent Fordham University graduates, Michael Menconi FCRH ’15 and Ken Ochs FCRH ’15 conducted the interview in June 2014, which focuses on many of the social justice issues currently highlighted by Pope Francis’ trip:

In response to a question on the unique responsibilities of young people today, particularly in relation to social justice, His Eminence explained that “if we properly understand who we are in God’s eyes…and in relation to other creatures and all of creation, we will sense that there are certain duties and obligations that simply flow from who we are.”

“This is not only an ethical, moral, religious, Catholic insight: it’s also a very American insight,” he continued. “It is at the heart of what our founders meant when they speak about the common good.  As a civic society, especially at the very core of an enlightened democracy, who we are as privileged citizens of this republic have certain duties which arise from within, upon which a democracy is to depend if it is to flourish.  I would congratulate Pope Francis for reminding us of this.”

Read a summary of their 90-minute conversation below, or read the full interview transcript. 

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The Poor and Marginalized are not ‘Boxes to be Checked’: Reflections on Matthew 25

Photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net.

Photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net.

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION

By John Tracey

“For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me. . . Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me” (Matthew 25: 35-36, 40)

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Putting Justice Back in the Justice System: ‘It is time to defend the basic human rights of the voiceless individuals’

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

STUDENT VOICES

By Alyssa Dolan

The dialogue on the imprisonment of those with intellectual development disorders (IDDs) has progressively grown silent. Crucial to this nonexistent discourse is the tendency of the justice system to criminalize the traits associated with such disorders – traits including tendencies to tune people out, to repeat actions and words, to have poor eye contact, to fail to follow directions.

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