Tag Archives: Supreme Court

Shifting Sands: Absolutism to Relativism in Irish Medical Ethics

By Adam McAuley, Ph.D.

On Thursday, June 13th, the Irish government published its Abortion Bill to regulate the extremely limited circumstances under which an abortion is lawful in Ireland. The Bill’s conscientious objection provision reflects the limited development of ethical thought, debate and education in Ireland.

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Ethics and Society Newsfeed: May 29th 2013

Three-Parent Embryos: Mitochondrial Transfer IVF is Worth Pursuing 
Even though it is technically possible to create an embryo using the genetic material of three parents, is it ethically desirable?

The Abortion Issue Returns
With the Supreme Court hearing cases on various contentious issues, they are likely to return to one of their most enduring controversies: abortion.
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Getting Clear on Rights and Rules: The Intersection of Law and Philosophy

Michael Baur is a philosopher-lawyer who uses his double expertise to study social ontology.   Photo by Bruce Gilbert

Michael Baur is a philosopher-lawyer who uses his double expertise to study social ontology.
Photo by Bruce Gilbert

By Joanna Klimaski

If a tree falls on you in the woods and nobody sees it, have you been wronged?

You might have been harmed, but you would probably not accuse the tree of violating your human rights by falling over and crushing you. Unless, that is, you believe that rights are non-relational—then you might have some trouble getting the tree off the hook.

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