Category Archives: Bioethics

Fisher describes innovative approach to research involving vulnerable adolescents at OHRP conference

 

Screenshot 2016-04-07 10.41.21

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director and Marie Ward Doty University Chair in Ethics Dr. Celia B. Fisher gave the keynote address this morning at an Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) conference, entitled “Vulnerable, Marginalized and At-Risk Participants in Research.”

In this address, Fisher describes her innovative approach to giving vulnerable adolescents and their families a voice in ensuring the responsible conduct of research. Her work illuminates the importance of fitting research ethics protections to the real world lives of LGBT teens, pediatric cancer patients, and ethnic minority youth in ways that reflect their values and merit their trust.

Continue reading

#BioethicsSoWhite

 

By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

In a recent article in the American Journal of Bioethics Kayhan Parsi of the Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine exhorted bioethicists to address racism in their work. What the article did not address is why in 2016 it has taken bioethics so long to recognize a problem existing for more than 50 years since the field’s nascence.

Continue reading

10 years after Vioxx scandal, pharmaceutical companies caught again misleading patients using false claims

Screenshot 2016-03-02 11.06.12

Pharmaceutical companies have once again used industry influence to conceal data and make false claims about a high-profile medication.

Today The New York Times reported that Johnson & Johnson and Bayer – the companies behind the anti-clotting drug Xarelto – are responsible for critical laboratory data being left out of a letter published in The New England Journal of Medicine discussing the safety of the medication. Lawyers representing patients suing the two major pharmaceutical companies claim that both corporations were complicit by remaining silent about the data concealed from the publication.

Continue reading

So-called ‘female Viagra’ even less effective than suggested, not selling well

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

UPDATE: 2/29/16: An article published today in JAMA Internal Medicine found that Addyi — the so-called “female Viagra” —  is even less effective than initially thought, resulting in only one-half of one additional satisfying sexual experience per month for the women taking the medication.

The drug has not been selling well since it received FDA approval in August 2015. As of early January 2016, only 240-290 prescription for Addyi were written each week, according to a recent report cited in The New York Times. The report estimates that sales are currently running at a rate of around $11 million per year, far lower than the projected $100 to $150 million in revenue for this year.

For additional discussion of Addyi, the drug’s efficacy, and the ethical implications, please continue reading below.

Continue reading

First Uterus Transplant in U.S. Performed at the Cleveland Clinic

Surgical team behind the first uterus transplant in the United States, via The Cleveland Clinic.

Surgical team behind the first uterus transplant in the United States, via The Cleveland Clinic.

The first uterus transplant in the United States took place yesterday at the Cleveland Clinic. The patient is currently in “stable condition,” and more details about the procedure will be released next week at a press conference.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Bioethicist Dr. Elizabeth Yuko discussed the ethical implications of uterus transplants in a Fordham News story predicting significant news stories of 2016, as well as in two posts on Ethics & Society in January 2014 and August 2015.

The uterus transplant that took place yesterday in Cleveland differs from those that occurred in Sweden in 2014, because the recipient received the uterus from a deceased donor. The wombs transplanted in the Swedish trial all came from living donors, which raises additional ethical questions regarding living donors undergoing serious surgery for a non-life-saving transplant.

Please read Dr. Yuko’s previous discussions of this topic for further details.

The CDC Recommends Women of Childbearing Age Use Contraception if They Wish to Drink Alcohol

By Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued a recommendation that women of childbearing age should abstain from alcohol consumption unless they are on some form of contraception.

This is ethically problematic for several reasons, the first being the blatant and outright paternalism and mistrust of women.

The CDC Vital Signs report estimates that “3.3 million women between the ages of 15 and 44 are at risk of exposing their developing baby to alcohol because they are drinking, sexually active, and not using birth control to prevent pregnancy.” While the CDC’s intentions are good – attempting to curb incidents of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders – advocating a policy that does not respect women’s autonomy when it comes to making decisions regarding  consumption of alcohol and use of contraception is troubling.

Continue reading

Criminology and Research Ethics: Drawing the Line in Animal Research

STUDENT VOICES

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

By: Michael S. Dauber

“In order to study blood-spatter patterns, a group of researchers in New Zealand strapped pigs to a surgical table and shot them in the head. Some of these animals were alive. Nasty, for sure, but apparently humane. The study has been justified by the government-funded Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR), one of the collaborators, because if translatable to humans, the findings might have use in solving crimes involving gunshot wounds.”[1]

Research ethics has been a hot subject in recent years, especially when it relates to experiments involving harm towards animals. Many object to the practice entirely, citing the fact that they believe killing is always wrong, the notion that our treatment of non-human animal subjects is speciesist[2] (meaning discrimination based on species), and that it is wrong to use animals for experiments that have no way to consent to research participation.

Continue reading