Category Archives: Fordham University Student Voices

What Would Aristotle Say About the Ethics of Publicly Subsidized Puberty-Blockers?

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STUDENT VOICES

By Melani Shahin

In October 2014, Oregon became one of the few states to cover hormone suppressant therapy for transgender minors under Medicaid. The purpose of this treatment is to temporarily suppress puberty in transgender young people via hormone suppressant drugs, such as Lupron. While Oregon’s coverage of puberty blockers for minors under the state Medicaid plan increases the accessibility of this treatment, an interesting ethical question emerges for taxpayers, healthcare providers, and families: can minors truly give informed consent to this kind of medical treatment?

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Why Science Denial is Immoral

By Christopher S. Kovel, M.A.

Today’s society is built and shaped by technology and scientific discovery but, surprisingly, pervading scientific denial lingers. Irrational skepticism and flat-out denial of uncontroversial theories is not just a rebuke of the facts of science and an insult to toiling scientists in their respective fields, but should also be seen as a moral dereliction, capable of great harm if not remedied.

According to recent Gallup polls, two scientific theories in particular – evolution and anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change – struggle to gain widespread national acceptance. In 2014, 42% of Americans said they believe that God created humans in their present form (i.e. evolution never occurred). In the same poll, another 31% said they accept that humans evolved, but under God’s supervision and direction (commonly referred to as intelligent design). Only 19% said they believe the current scientific explanation of the origins of humans—that we evolved like every other organism on earth, through a natural process following biological principles.

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Donald Trump, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace Ethics

STUDENT VOICES

By Emily Jenab

Donald Trump is the physical manifestation of a unique brand of modern racism that has been festering within the Republican Party for years – cumulating, now, in their very own monster. He is the screaming id of our nation; a leader who has cemented himself through an explicitly discriminatory campaign, that at all at once is anti-women, anti-Hispanic, anti-immigrant, and anti-Muslim.

Trump promises to make America great again, cognizant, of course, of the fact that for many years our country was only great for white, able-bodied, cis men. He is a palpably scary force in that he provides a sense of legitimacy to the darkest corners of our society. He seems to revel in the production of it all: removing people of color from his rallies, and calling for the “good old dayswhen punches could be thrown, continuously turning to incendiary tactics.

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Study shows that marijuana has a significant role in relieving PTSD symptoms in combat veterans, more research on the way

STUDENT VOICES

By: Kyle Pritz

The scantiness of marijuana research in the United States of America shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. The lack of research is tremendous. However, with new decriminalizing laws budding up, the role of marijuana usage in the symptomatic relief of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic disorders is receiving uncustomary attention in the United States.

In a study published in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs in 2014, two American psychologists based at SUNY Albany, Jamie Bolles and Mitchell Earleywine, investigated the relationship between marijuana, expectancies, and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Using an online questionnaire and maintaining anonymity to enhance the response rate, Earleywine & Bolles surveyed more than 650 combat-exposed, male veterans who used marijuana at least once per week.

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Ethical Formation: Does Beyoncé’s New Video Profit from Imagery of Hurricane Katrina?

STUDENT VOICES

By: Emily Jenab

When Beyoncé dropped her recent single “Formation,” she received notable praise for her integration of black pride into mainstream music. However, she also received criticism from natives of New Orleans, who were appalled at watching their trauma from Hurricane Katrina unfold in a 5-minute video. There are stories, histories, narratives, that cannot be told in minutes – pain that cannot be adequately addressed in a short video.

This raises questions about ethics and morals when it comes to capitalizing on the use of other’s stories of pain for success, similar to those raised in a previous post on the ethics of storytelling in Humans of New York.

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Is there an ethics code for storytelling?: the phenomenon of Humans of New York

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STUDENT VOICES

By: Emily Jenab

Humans of New York has become inescapable. Photographer Brandon Stanton is singlehandedly telling multiple stories: effectively creating empathy in the cold, often isolating experience of New York; unearthing the humanity in the overlooked. It is noble work that has reached millions.

I have often found myself consumed by the stories and photographs of the ignored, not to mention pleased with his work in Iran and Pakistan, defying stereotypes with each humanizing tale posted. His work seems to be the modern-day activism that we have come to love: a way of creating connections to faces on our screens in a globalized world.

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Ethics in Online Activism: False Senses of Social Action or Effective Source of Change?

Via freedigitalphotos.net

Via freedigitalphotos.net

By: Rimah Jaber

Advances in technological devices and social media platforms are creating an environment where news and information from around the world are accessible at our fingertips. Whether we are simply procuring news faster through incessant notifications or obtaining eyewitness footage at the scene of a crime opening an app, social media is reaching the public in ways never seen before.

The drawbacks of this, however, are blurred lines between the presentation of facts and opinions, as well as between social awareness and action. Many people have always felt compelled to give back to their communities in some way, but there is a growing skepticism of whether or not sectors of online activism are more self-interested than socially interested. Are people being given an illusion of fulfillment after writing a passionate anti-discrimination post on Facebook? Are organizations doing anything with the thousands of electronic signatures on a petition for animal rights?

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