Tag Archives: Bioethics

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: April 8, 2016

Can we trust robots to make moral decisions?
Last week, Microsoft inadvertently revealed the difficulty of creating moral robots.

Why Bioethics Has a Race Problem
Moral imagination in bioethics has largely failed African Americans.

The disturbing reason some African American patients may be undertreated for pain
African Americans are routinely under-treated for their pain compared with whites, according to research.

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#BioethicsSoWhite

 

By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.

In a recent article in the American Journal of Bioethics Kayhan Parsi of the Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine exhorted bioethicists to address racism in their work. What the article did not address is why in 2016 it has taken bioethics so long to recognize a problem existing for more than 50 years since the field’s nascence.

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 4, 2016

NIH vowed to move its research chimps from labs, but only 7 got safe haven in 2015
Nearly three years after the National Institutes of Health announced that hundreds of chimpanzees held for invasive medical experiments would be retired to a sanctuary, relatively few have been so lucky. Only seven made the trip in all of 2015.

The Brain Gets Its Day in Court
A new study found that the number of judicial opinions referencing neuroscience as evidence more than doubled between 2005 and 2012.

The Consequences of Poor Science Education in Kindergarten
A majority of low-income and minority kindergarteners come in with poor general science knowledge—and closing that gap may be crucial for ensuring academic success later on.

A Baby, a Baboon Heart, and the Transplant Heard Round the World: The Story of the First Neonatal Cardiac Xenotransplant in History
Stephanie Fae Beauclair, better known to history as Baby Fae, was born October 14, 1984 with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Baby Fae needed a heart transplant to survive but a human heart was not available to her. What happened next challenged the boundaries of medical science and bioethics.

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First Uterus Transplant in U.S. Performed at the Cleveland Clinic

Surgical team behind the first uterus transplant in the United States, via The Cleveland Clinic.

Surgical team behind the first uterus transplant in the United States, via The Cleveland Clinic.

The first uterus transplant in the United States took place yesterday at the Cleveland Clinic. The patient is currently in “stable condition,” and more details about the procedure will be released next week at a press conference.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Bioethicist Dr. Elizabeth Yuko discussed the ethical implications of uterus transplants in a Fordham News story predicting significant news stories of 2016, as well as in two posts on Ethics & Society in January 2014 and August 2015.

The uterus transplant that took place yesterday in Cleveland differs from those that occurred in Sweden in 2014, because the recipient received the uterus from a deceased donor. The wombs transplanted in the Swedish trial all came from living donors, which raises additional ethical questions regarding living donors undergoing serious surgery for a non-life-saving transplant.

Please read Dr. Yuko’s previous discussions of this topic for further details.

Confidentiality and Disclosure Dilemmas in Psychotherapy with Adolescents

Dr. Adam Fried

Dr. Adam Fried

For more information, please visit & “like” RELAY: Resources & Education for LGBT & Allied Youth: www.facebook.com/lgbtrelay

Psychologists who provide mental health services to adolescents and their families must navigate complex ethical challenges with respect to confidentiality and disclosure decision-making.

How do mental health clinicians develop confidentiality policies that serve to protect minors from serious harm, fulfill professional and legal responsibilities, and preserve the therapeutic relationship with the adolescent and parents/ guardians?

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 5, 2016

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

Photo via freedigitalphotos.net.

UnitedHealth Medicare plan must cover U.S. sex reassignment surgery
A U.S. government panel has ruled that a privately run Medicare plan must cover sex reassignment surgery for a Texas transgender woman, a decision her attorney says was the first of its kind.

New wearable sensor can collect data from sweat
For the first time, a flexible, wearable sensor can collect data about multiple chemicals in body sweat.

Drug shortages forcing hard decisions on rationing treatments
Such shortages are the new normal in American medicine. But the rationing that results has been largely hidden from patients and the public.

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Transplant Tourism, A New Kind of Trade: Ethics of Kidney Transplants, Technology & Exploitation of Donors

 

Image via freedigitalphotos.net

Image via freedigitalphotos.net

STUDENT VOICES | 2015 CHYNN PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION

By: Christina Sailer

One of the great miracles of modern medicine is the ability to save a dying patient through organ transplantation. However, there still remains a worldwide shortage of organs and an excess of disadvantaged individuals who believe their salvation is not to receive, but sell one.

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