TEDxFordhamUniversity: Lesson in Bioethics Given by Golden Girls | Dr. Elizabeth Yuko

As one of the most groundbreaking sitcoms of all time, The Golden Girls introduced a range of bioethical issues on the show regarding medicine, the human body and women’s health.

In this TEDx Talk, Dr. Elizabeth Yuko, a Fordham University Center for Ethics Education  fellow and adjunct professor, discusses how influential Golden Girls was, and still is, as a lens for the study of bioethics and its principles using examples from the show’s most notable episodes.

Watch below:

Dr. Elizabeth Yuko is also the Health Editor at SheKnows Media, a women’s lifestyle digital media company operating SheKnows.com. BlogHer.com. HelloFlo.com and STYLECASTER.com. Please visit her website and Twitter page for more information.

Seeing Red, Feeling Blue: Fordham Historians Discuss the 2016 Election

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Following the 2016 election this month, a panel of historians at Fordham University discussed the results and President-Elect Trump through the lenses of different historical perspectives on November 22, 2016.

The panelists discussed several issues including, but not limited to, Latino/hispanic votes, immigration, fascism and the “alt-right,” mistrust of the United States government, misogyny, white supremacy, Islamophobia, women’s rights and more.

The panel was comprised of faculty with various levels of expertise in diverse fields of history:

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Moderator David Myers with panelists

Sal Acosta, Ph.D., United States history and United States Latino/Hispanic history

Christopher Dietrich, Ph.D., United States history and foreign policy, specifically post-WW2 era

Kirsten Swinth, Ph.D., U.S. since 1945 and U.S. women’s and gender history

Magda Teter, Ph.D., European history

To listen to this discussion, please play the audio below:

Highlights:

On the Latino vote: The media “distorted” the Latino vote in the media to have people believe they voted in favor in Trump. In reality, an exit poll of 5,600 people found that 79% of Latinos voted in favor of Clinton. – Dr. Acosta

On fascism: The “dual crisis” of political arrangements not functioning well and malfunctions in the government creating mistrust make “fascism appealing.” – Dr. Dietrich

On women: White women voted Republican in the 2016 election as “party affiliation trumps gender” typically when voting. – Dr. Swinth

On trends across Europe and the U.S.: There is a wave of nativists and right-wing movements in countries like Russia, Poland and England, and America and Israel are “part of that shift” as emotions of “fear, despair and post-economic crisis” dominate. – Dr. Teter

Transnational Reproduction: Race, Kinship and Commercial Surrogacy in India

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Wednesday, April 27, 12:15 – 1:30 p.m. | Walsh Library Special Collections room

Join us for a lunchtime lecture and discussion led by Daisy Deomampo, Ph.D. (assistant professor of anthropology, Fordham). Her research focuses on the intersection between technology, gender, health and social justice. She will discuss her long-term ethnographic fieldwork in India with surrogate mothers and Western intended parents, described in her forthcoming book “Transnational Reproduction: Race, Kinship and Commercial Surrogacy” (NYU Press, 2016). A brief response will be provided by Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D. (Center for Ethics Education).

LUNCH WILL BE SERVED

Please RSVP to ethics@fordham.edu or 718-817-0926

Fordham Panel to Address Questions about Human Rights in Age of Fear, Violence and Scarce Resources 

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By: Michael Aprea       

Few realities have shaken the foundation of human rights and the inherent liberties viewed common to all as profoundly as fear. Human rights, the set of rights believed to be intrinsic to the human person, are the cornerstone of modern society. They are the very building blocks of our nation and of the free world.

On April 5th, the Fordham Center for Religion and Culture and the Fordham Center for Ethics Education will hold an interdisciplinary forum to address questions about the endurance of human rights in the wake of society’s struggle to maintain both justice and compassion in world torn by violence, injustice, hatred and limited resources. This symposium, titled “In Good Conscience: Human Rights in an age of Terrorism, Violence, and Limited Resources,” will feature distinguished speakers:

Ivan Šimonović: Assistant Secretary-General, United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

Consolee Nishimwe: Rwandan genocide survivor and author of Tested to the Limit: A Genocide Survivor’s Story of Pain, Resilience, and Hope.

Celia B. Fisher, PhD: Marie Ward Doty University Endowed Chair and Professor of Psychology, Director Center for Ethics Education, Fordham University

Matthew C. Waxman: Liviu Librescu Professor of Law; Faculty Chair, Roger Hertog Program on Law and National Security, Columbia University

Andrea Bartoli, PhD: Dean of the School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University

Continue reading “Fordham Panel to Address Questions about Human Rights in Age of Fear, Violence and Scarce Resources “

In Good Conscience: Human Rights in an Age of Terrorism, Violence, and Limited Resources

Pervasive fears sparked by acts of terror, violent crime and resource scarcity test our values and raise critical questions about how enduring our support for human rights may be.

When does the right to live safely and securely trump our obligation to uphold basic human rights? Is our attitude toward extreme remedies such as capital punishment and torture rooted in principle or in pragmatism? What do we owe survivors of genocide and other tragedies?

Join us for a forum on the challenge of upholding human rights, compassion and justice in an increasingly insecure world, April 5th, 2016, 6 – 8 p.m., Fordham Law School.

Admission is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to crcevent@fordham.edu, or call 212-636-7347. For more information, please visit the conference website.

Continue reading “In Good Conscience: Human Rights in an Age of Terrorism, Violence, and Limited Resources”

Recommendations and Resources Exploring Faculty Responsibilities Toward Students in Distress

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On November 18, 2015, the Center for Ethics Education and the Institutional Equity and Compliance Office hosted discussion with Fordham faculty and teaching fellows entitled “Exploring Faculty Responsibilities Toward Students in Distress.” This seminar featured brief presentations by Fordham faculty from different departments and an illuminating discussion about experiences, challenges, and opportunities for faculty encountering students in distress.

Continue reading “Recommendations and Resources Exploring Faculty Responsibilities Toward Students in Distress”

Ethics & Society 2015 Year in Review

Starting with a national discussion on vaccinations, public health and autonomy, and ending with widespread reflection on yet another mass shooting, 2015 had no shortage of ethics-related news and events.

Here are a few highlights of the work of Fordham University Center for Ethics Education faculty, staff, and students from 2015:

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Contributes to National Discussion on Ethical Review & Oversight Issues in Standard of Care Research

Common clinical practices might lack a robust evidence base if there have not been empirical interventional research studies to compare an array of available routine or standard treatment options. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, an internationally renowned expert on empirical research on research ethics, recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in an Institute of Medicine (IOM) workshop aimed to inform practice and policy of regulated research studies involving standard of care interventions. Read more here.

 

Continue reading “Ethics & Society 2015 Year in Review”