Tag Archives: Elizabeth Yuko

Best intentions, worst outcomes: Ethical and legal challenges for international research involving sex workers

Central America hosts a thriving sex work industry that is a key source and transit region for sex trafficking and undocumented migrants engaged in sex work. Sex workers – particularly those who are migrant – are at high risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections as well as physical abuse and in some cases murder. However, the existing network of international, national, and local criminal and human rights policies applicable to sex workers can be confusing and contradictory, not only in the context of access to sexual health preventions and interventions, but also for investigators seeking to conduct that can lead to effective sexual health services.

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Transnational Reproduction: Race, Kinship and Commercial Surrogacy in India

surrogacy

Wednesday, April 27, 12:15 – 1:30 p.m. | Walsh Library Special Collections room

Join us for a lunchtime lecture and discussion led by Daisy Deomampo, Ph.D. (assistant professor of anthropology, Fordham). Her research focuses on the intersection between technology, gender, health and social justice. She will discuss her long-term ethnographic fieldwork in India with surrogate mothers and Western intended parents, described in her forthcoming book “Transnational Reproduction: Race, Kinship and Commercial Surrogacy” (NYU Press, 2016). A brief response will be provided by Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D. (Center for Ethics Education).

LUNCH WILL BE SERVED

Please RSVP to ethics@fordham.edu or 718-817-0926

So-called ‘female Viagra’ even less effective than suggested, not selling well

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

UPDATE: 2/29/16: An article published today in JAMA Internal Medicine found that Addyi — the so-called “female Viagra” —  is even less effective than initially thought, resulting in only one-half of one additional satisfying sexual experience per month for the women taking the medication.

The drug has not been selling well since it received FDA approval in August 2015. As of early January 2016, only 240-290 prescription for Addyi were written each week, according to a recent report cited in The New York Times. The report estimates that sales are currently running at a rate of around $11 million per year, far lower than the projected $100 to $150 million in revenue for this year.

For additional discussion of Addyi, the drug’s efficacy, and the ethical implications, please continue reading below.

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First Uterus Transplant in U.S. Performed at the Cleveland Clinic

Surgical team behind the first uterus transplant in the United States, via The Cleveland Clinic.

Surgical team behind the first uterus transplant in the United States, via The Cleveland Clinic.

The first uterus transplant in the United States took place yesterday at the Cleveland Clinic. The patient is currently in “stable condition,” and more details about the procedure will be released next week at a press conference.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Bioethicist Dr. Elizabeth Yuko discussed the ethical implications of uterus transplants in a Fordham News story predicting significant news stories of 2016, as well as in two posts on Ethics & Society in January 2014 and August 2015.

The uterus transplant that took place yesterday in Cleveland differs from those that occurred in Sweden in 2014, because the recipient received the uterus from a deceased donor. The wombs transplanted in the Swedish trial all came from living donors, which raises additional ethical questions regarding living donors undergoing serious surgery for a non-life-saving transplant.

Please read Dr. Yuko’s previous discussions of this topic for further details.

The CDC Recommends Women of Childbearing Age Use Contraception if They Wish to Drink Alcohol

By Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued a recommendation that women of childbearing age should abstain from alcohol consumption unless they are on some form of contraception.

This is ethically problematic for several reasons, the first being the blatant and outright paternalism and mistrust of women.

The CDC Vital Signs report estimates that “3.3 million women between the ages of 15 and 44 are at risk of exposing their developing baby to alcohol because they are drinking, sexually active, and not using birth control to prevent pregnancy.” While the CDC’s intentions are good – attempting to curb incidents of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders – advocating a policy that does not respect women’s autonomy when it comes to making decisions regarding  consumption of alcohol and use of contraception is troubling.

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Ethics & Society 2015 Year in Review

Starting with a national discussion on vaccinations, public health and autonomy, and ending with widespread reflection on yet another mass shooting, 2015 had no shortage of ethics-related news and events.

Here are a few highlights of the work of Fordham University Center for Ethics Education faculty, staff, and students from 2015:

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Contributes to National Discussion on Ethical Review & Oversight Issues in Standard of Care Research

Common clinical practices might lack a robust evidence base if there have not been empirical interventional research studies to compare an array of available routine or standard treatment options. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher, an internationally renowned expert on empirical research on research ethics, recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in an Institute of Medicine (IOM) workshop aimed to inform practice and policy of regulated research studies involving standard of care interventions. Read more here.

 

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‘Family is Family’: Why Intel’s New Adoption & Fertility Policies are a Step in the Right Direction

sperm and eggs

Via freedigitalphotos.net

By Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

This week Intel announced new job benefit policies that include tripling their adoption assistance program, and quadrupling their fertility coverage, noting, “family is family – no matter what it looks like.”

This comes after the company unveiled an expanded “family bonding leave” policy in January, which allows employees who are new parents to take up to eight weeks of paid leave, in addition to the existing pregnancy policy that provides new mothers with up to 13 weeks of paid time off. The “family bonding leave” can be taken any time within the first 12 months of a child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement.

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