What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism

Over the weekend, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Postdoctoral Fellow and Program Administrator for the Adolescent Scientific Access Project Dr. Miriam R. Arbeit graduated from Tufts University with a Ph.D. in Child Study and Human Development, and served as the student speaker for the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Doctoral Hooding Ceremony.

Entitled, “What are we ready to risk? Academia, advocacy, and activism,” Dr. Arbeit’s speech addressed the concept of solidarity and risk sharing, particularly in an academic context.

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Immigrant Detention, Genetic Testing, and Moral Obligations to LGBT Youth: Theories & Applications in Contemporary Ethics

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The Fordham University Center for Ethics Education is hosting a 3-day intensive cross-disciplinary graduate course entitled “Theories and Applications in Contemporary Ethics.” The course will take place next week, from May 19-21, 2015 on the Rose Hill campus.

Each day will feature two Fordham faculty members from different departments presenting on and discussing different topics in contemporary ethics. Using a team-teaching approach, this course brings together faculty from six disciplines to provide foundational knowledge about moral philosophy, moral theology, and bioethics, and features lectures and case discussion on issues of current social importance.

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What Mad Men’s Betty Draper-Francis Can Teach Us About Paternalism in Medicine

January Jones as Betty Draper-Francis on AMC's Mad Men.

January Jones as Betty Draper-Francis on AMC’s Mad Men.

By: Elizabeth Yuko, Ph.D.

Warning: spoilers ahead.

The penultimate episode of AMC’s Mad Men provided an all-too-familiar portrayal of the paternalistic nature of medicine via the handling of Betty Draper-Francis’s diagnosis of lung cancer. While the episode takes place in 1970 and there has since been a gradual shift to a more patient-centered approach in medicine, it offers a glimpse into power imbalances in medical care that still can occur today.

When Betty’s new classmates bring her to the emergency room, the first words out of the doctor’s mouth are “Mrs. Francis, is it possible to get your husband down here?” Betty assumes it is for the purpose of driving her home, but the doctor assures her that it is, in fact, for the purpose of explaining her condition to her husband, Henry, either prior to or at the same time he discloses the diagnosis to Betty.

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Book Review: The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer

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Book Review: The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015). ISBN 978-0-300-18027-5.

Reviewed by Michael S. Dauber

Peter Singer’s new book The Most Good You Can Do is the latest installment in a series of works dedicated to advancing altruism as a way of life. The book expands directly on Singer’s work in The Life You Can Save (2010), a best-selling text that argued that our obligation to help the poor overseas is just as strong as the obligation to save a drowning child one comes across in a river: if one can easily help, one is required to, and distance and nationality are not excuses to withhold aid.

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Modern Family: Dr. Celia B. Fisher Discusses Ethics, Biological Parenthood & Sofia Vergara’s Frozen Embryos

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher

On Thursday, April 30th, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Dr. Celia B. Fisher was interviewed by ABC 7 Eyewitness News on the ethics of the right to biological parenthood and the moral responsibility of prospective parents. These issues were raised in the context of actress Sofia Vergara’s current legal battle with her ex-fiancé regarding the future of two frozen embryos they created when they were together.

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The Significance of Philosophical Ethics in a Scientific World

 STUDENT VOICES

By: Michael S. Dauber

In the course of my studies and in my everyday experiences, I have often been asked about the significance of philosophy. What is it? Does philosophy even matter anymore since science answers many of our pressing questions?

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Fordham Law Graduate Addresses Legal Ethics of ‘Better Call Saul’

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Each episode of AMC’s Breaking Bad spinoff/prequel Better Call Saul features the main character involved in some sort of murky legal and ethical situations. After noticing that other podcasts and blogs that discuss the show had not yet adequately addressed the legal ethics issues that arise in each episode, New York-based ethics lawyer and Fordham University School of Law  graduate Nicole Hyland decided to fill that void.

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