In Good Conscience: Human Rights in an Age of Terrorism, Violence, and Limited Resources

Pervasive fears sparked by acts of terror, violent crime and resource scarcity test our values and raise critical questions about how enduring our support for human rights may be.

When does the right to live safely and securely trump our obligation to uphold basic human rights? Is our attitude toward extreme remedies such as capital punishment and torture rooted in principle or in pragmatism? What do we owe survivors of genocide and other tragedies?

Join us for a forum on the challenge of upholding human rights, compassion and justice in an increasingly insecure world, April 5th, 2016, 6 – 8 p.m., Fordham Law School.

Admission is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to crcevent@fordham.edu, or call 212-636-7347. For more information, please visit the conference website.

Speakers:

Ivan Simonovic

Ivan Simonovic, Assistant Secretary-General, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations

Ivan Šimonović is the former Minister of Justice-designate of Croatia. He has worked as a politician and diplomat, working with organizations like the Croatian Diplomatic Corps. Šimonović is a graduate of the University of Zagreb Law School. In 1997, Šimonović moderated the United Nations Economic and Socil Council. In May 2010, Šimonović was appointed became the Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights.

Consolee Nishimwee

Consolee Nishimwee, Rwandan genocide survivor and author of Tested to the Limit: A Genocide Survivor’s Story of Pain, Resilience, and Hope.

Consolee Nishimwe is an outspoken speaker on the topic of genocide, and an active advocate against rights violations. She works with global issues of women’s rights, and with other genocide survivors.

Celia Fisher

Celia B. Fisher, PhD, Marie Ward Doty University Endowed Chair and Professor of Psychology, Director Center for Ethics Education, Fordham University

Celia B. Fisher, PhD, is the Marie Ward Doty Endowed University Chair and Professor of Psychology, and founding Director of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education. She currently directs the NIDA funded Fordham University Training Institute on HIV Prevention Research Ethics. She also currently serves as a member on the National Academies’ Revisions to the Common Rule for the Protection of Human Subjects in Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences.  She is past Chair of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Human Studies Review Board, a past member of the DHHS Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP; and co-chair of the SACHRP Subcommittee on Children’s Research) and a founding editor of the journal Applied Developmental Science.

LangCol. Patrick Lang (Ret.) President, Global Resources Group

Patrick Lang is President and CEO of the Global Resources Group. He has served for many years in the Defense Intelligence Agency as Director of Human Intelligence Collection. Prior to that, he was the Defense Intelligence Officer for the Middle East, South Asia, and Terrorism. He was a principal advisor to the Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Joint Staff, and the President of the United States for Middle Eastern affairs during the Iran-Iraq war and the 1990–1991 Gulf War. A commissioned officer in the U.S. Army from 1962–1988, he served several tours of duty in Vietnam in the Special Forces and has taught at West Point. He writes widely on military intelligence in professional and popular publications. His blog, Sic Temper Tyrannis, regularly treats military and intelligence issues.
Andrea Bartoli

Moderator:
Andrea Bartoli, PhD, Dean of the School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University

Andrea Bartoli is an international conflict resolution expert. He has served as dean of George Mason University’s School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, and is the founder and former director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.


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