Category Archives: Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute

Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses Stigma for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men

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Dr. Jonathon Rendina, Hunter College, CUNY

The minority stress theory suggests that health disparities experienced by gay and bisexual men (GBM) and other sexual minorities can be explained in terms of stigma-related stressors such as discrimination at work, school, religious institutions, communities and families. The unique stressors of an HIV-positive status experienced by GBM, however, has been overlooked within research on minority stress.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) Fellow Dr. Jon Rendina, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Faculty Investigator and Director of Quantitative Methods at The Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training (CHEST) of Hunter College, CUNY, recently addressed this issue within a paper published in Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Dr. Rendina has been conducting HIV research with GBM for more than ten years. He explained the need to thoroughly test “the role of internalized stigma about sexual orientation, or internalized homophobia, and internalized HIV stigma within a unified model to see whether one or both have an impact on HIV-positive gay or bisexual men.” Although it is already established that GBM are negatively impacted by internalized sexual minority stigma, the purpose of this study was to further explore the impact of HIV-related stressors on the health of GBM.

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RETI Fellow Examines Intersectional Stigma for HIV-Positive African American Women

Dr. Faith Fletcher, University of Illinois at Chicago

While bearing the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDs in the US, African American women also face multi-level stigma at social, community and institutional levels, which is exacerbated by their HIV-positive status.

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) fellow Dr. Faith E. Fletcher, an Assistant Professor in Community Health Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago, recently addressed this issue using her dissertation research in an article titled, “She Told Them, Oh That Bitch Got AIDS”: Experiences of Multi-Level HIV/AIDS- Related Stigma among African American Women Living with HIV/AIDS in the South” published in AIDS Patient Care and STDs.

Dr. Fletcher interviewed 42 African American women with HIV/AIDS living in South Carolina. She found that “HIV/AIDS stigma permeated many dimensions of women’s lives, including the research process.” Using narrative data and the Social Ecological Model, Dr. Fletcher’s findings demonstrate the need for an enhanced understanding of multi-level stigma experienced by HIV-positive African American women to inform innovative and tailored approaches.“Settings that are generally regarded as safe spaces for most individuals are not necessarily safe for HIV-positive African American women due to the intersections of stigma in places where women “live, work, love, play, and pray,” Dr. Fletcher explained.

Although many women in the study identified their homes as safe spaces to complete interviews, several participants completed interviews in Dr. Fletcher’s car to enhance privacy. Dr. Fletcher contends “ethical challenges in the research process emanating from additive, layered stigma can limit the availability of invulnerable research spaces.”  Dr. Fletcher shared that her research and training at RETI has offered her a strong foundation to identify and address ethical issues that may arise while engaging communities in the HIV research process.

Please click here for more information on the Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI).

Citation: Fletcher FE, Annang L, Kerr J, Buchberg M, Bogdan-Lovis L, Philpott-Jones S. “She Told Them, Oh That Bitch Got AIDS”: Experiences of Multi-Level HIV/AIDS- Related Stigma among African American Women Living with HIV/AIDS in the South. AIDS Patient Care and STDs. 2016 Jul;30(7):349-56. doi: 10.1089/apc.2016.0026. PMID:27410498.

Welcome 2016 HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows!

The Fordham HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute is delighted to announce that the following individuals have been selected as the 2016 fellows:

Dr. Roberto Adabie, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Dr. Roberto Adabie, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Dr. Suzanne Carlberg-Racich, DePaul University

Dr. Suzanne Carlberg-Racich, DePaul University

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Fordham RETI Fellows Present at PRIM&R Annual Meeting

Dr. Erin Bonar, Dr. Faith Fletcher, and Dr. Celia B. Fisher at the PRIM&R Annual Meeting 2015. Photo courtesy Sue Fish

Dr. Erin Bonar, Dr. Faith Fletcher, and Dr. Celia B. Fisher at the PRIM&R Annual Meeting 2015. Photo courtesy Dr. Sue Fish

The Fordham HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) was well-represented at the Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) Annual Meeting in Boston, November 12-15, with faculty and fellows presenting on their institute-funded research.

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Voices in HIV Research: How the Fordham Research Ethics Training Institute Shapes the Next Generation of Leaders

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One of the major strengths of the Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute is the encouragement of studies highlighting the various voices in HIV research, including those of the patients, participants, physicians, researchers, and communities.

It is important — on World AIDS Day in particular — to reflect on the work that has been done on HIV prevention, as well as the areas, populations, and co-morbidities that are still in need of research attention.

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Fordham’s Dr. Celia B. Fisher on Charlie Sheen’s HIV disclosures: ‘Sex workers may not have the economic or social power to say no’

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While there has been no shortage of coverage of actor Charlie Sheen’s announcement last week that he is HIV positive, one aspect of the story has been noticeably missing: the complex power dynamic when an HIV-positive individual solicits a sex worker. For many sex workers, negotiating terms or leaving the situation may not be an option.

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‘High-Profile and HIV+’ Revives Ethical Questions

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This piece was originally published yesterday on
the Fordham News blog

By: Gina Vergel

Actor Charlie Sheen made headlines in 2011 with a number of trips to rehab, his dismissal from hit show Two and a Half Men, and a public meltdown.

Four years later, he’s back in the news, as he revealed he is HIV positive in a TODAY interview with Matt Lauer.

“It’s a hard three letters to absorb. It’s a turning point in one’s life,” the 50-year-old actor said to Lauer.

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