Category Archives: Newsfeed

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: April 8, 2016

Can we trust robots to make moral decisions?
Last week, Microsoft inadvertently revealed the difficulty of creating moral robots.

Why Bioethics Has a Race Problem
Moral imagination in bioethics has largely failed African Americans.

The disturbing reason some African American patients may be undertreated for pain
African Americans are routinely under-treated for their pain compared with whites, according to research.

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: April 1, 2016

Heroin Epidemic Is Yielding to a Deadlier Cousin: Fentanyl
Cheaper and far more potent, the synthetic painkiller is becoming the drug of choice for some addicts — and is killing them more quickly.

Who’s “They?”
We are witnessing a great explosion in the way that human beings are allowed to express their gender identities. We are also hearing a lot of awkward conversations. What are we supposed to call everyone?

Hunting the Genetic Signs of Postpartum Depression With an iPhone App
With mothers and medical providers clamoring for answers about postpartum depression, scientists are beginning a major effort to understand the genetic underpinnings of mood disorders that afflict millions of women during and after pregnancy.

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 18, 2016

When Gene Tests for Breast Cancer Reveal Grim Data but No Guidance
Women with breast cancer are facing a frustrating reality: The genetic data is there, but in many cases, doctors do not know what to do with it.

First uterus transplant in US removed after sudden complication
The 26-year-old woman who received the transplant at the Cleveland Clinic is recovering from the operation after appearing in a news conference days earlier

​’Siri, I want to commit suicide’ and other statements likely to yield unhelpful responses from your phone
Apple’s Siri can be an amusing conversationalist for those times when you want to talk to someone but there’s no one around. She’s insanely knowledgeable about everything from American history to weather patterns and can crack you up with her well-timed zingers. But what about in times of crisis?

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 11

Europe’s Latest Proposal for the Refugee Crisis
Adam Chandler looks at discussions and the possibility of new limitations on immigration in Turkey. He examines the concerns of human rights groups on the matter.

The Government Is Secretly Huddling With Companies to Fight Extremism Online
Kaveh Waddell looks at pro-privacy groups and their response to the feds campaign to end terrorist calls to action online. What are the ethical implications of the feds’ proposals?

Free-Speech Advocates Are Not Trying to Silence Students
Conor Friedersdorf looks at recent issues with free speech on campuses, and looks at the notion that marginalized groups are most harmed by limited free speech.

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 4, 2016

NIH vowed to move its research chimps from labs, but only 7 got safe haven in 2015
Nearly three years after the National Institutes of Health announced that hundreds of chimpanzees held for invasive medical experiments would be retired to a sanctuary, relatively few have been so lucky. Only seven made the trip in all of 2015.

The Brain Gets Its Day in Court
A new study found that the number of judicial opinions referencing neuroscience as evidence more than doubled between 2005 and 2012.

The Consequences of Poor Science Education in Kindergarten
A majority of low-income and minority kindergarteners come in with poor general science knowledge—and closing that gap may be crucial for ensuring academic success later on.

A Baby, a Baboon Heart, and the Transplant Heard Round the World: The Story of the First Neonatal Cardiac Xenotransplant in History
Stephanie Fae Beauclair, better known to history as Baby Fae, was born October 14, 1984 with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Baby Fae needed a heart transplant to survive but a human heart was not available to her. What happened next challenged the boundaries of medical science and bioethics.

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 26, 2016

 

Apple vs. FBI is a sign of a dangerous divide
Rogers and Grumet examine Apple’s decision to fight a court order to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the terrorists involved in the San Bernardino, California, attack last year. They look at the ethical restraints on the FBI wanting software to unlock these devices.

Is Legalizing Prostitution the Best Way to Tackle Sex Trafficking
Bodenner discusses sex trafficking and the ways to combat it through different policies. He looks at the moral complexity of sex work, and the failure to protect many men and women involved.

UN: Zika-hit nations should allow access to contraception
The UN has released a video stating Zika hit nations should be allowed access to contraception.

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Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 19, 2016

Photo via Naitonal Archives Catalog

Participants in the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. | Photo via National Archives Catalog

Voices for Our Fathers Keeping Memory of Horrific Study Alive
The Tuskegee syphilis experiment recruited poor men with “bad blood” from rural Macon County, Ala., as test subjects. The study went on for decades, despite its ethical issues.

‘Government only pays for the positive outcomes.’ A strikingly new approach to social problems.
Two states announced Tuesday that they would experiment with an unusual method of financing human service programs that allows governments to pay nothing unless the programs are successful.

Needle Exchanges Can Now Get Federal Funding
Lifting the ban underscores a growing recognition that needle exchange programs can help reduce the the spread of infectious diseases

A First-Aid Class for Mental Health
Most people know how to help someone with a cut or a scrape. But what about a panic attack?

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