Seeing Red, Feeling Blue: Fordham Historians Discuss the 2016 Election

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Following the 2016 election this month, a panel of historians at Fordham University discussed the results and President-Elect Trump through the lenses of different historical perspectives on November 22, 2016.

The panelists discussed several issues including, but not limited to, Latino/hispanic votes, immigration, fascism and the “alt-right,” mistrust of the United States government, misogyny, white supremacy, Islamophobia, women’s rights and more.

The panel was comprised of faculty with various levels of expertise in diverse fields of history:

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Moderator David Myers with panelists

Sal Acosta, Ph.D., United States history and United States Latino/Hispanic history

Christopher Dietrich, Ph.D., United States history and foreign policy, specifically post-WW2 era

Kirsten Swinth, Ph.D., U.S. since 1945 and U.S. women’s and gender history

Magda Teter, Ph.D., European history

To listen to this discussion, please play the audio below:

Highlights:

On the Latino vote: The media “distorted” the Latino vote in the media to have people believe they voted in favor in Trump. In reality, an exit poll of 5,600 people found that 79% of Latinos voted in favor of Clinton. – Dr. Acosta

On fascism: The “dual crisis” of political arrangements not functioning well and malfunctions in the government creating mistrust make “fascism appealing.” – Dr. Dietrich

On women: White women voted Republican in the 2016 election as “party affiliation trumps gender” typically when voting. – Dr. Swinth

On trends across Europe and the U.S.: There is a wave of nativists and right-wing movements in countries like Russia, Poland and England, and America and Israel are “part of that shift” as emotions of “fear, despair and post-economic crisis” dominate. – Dr. Teter

Shifting Sands: Absolutism to Relativism in Irish Medical Ethics

By Adam McAuley, Ph.D.

On Thursday, June 13th, the Irish government published its Abortion Bill to regulate the extremely limited circumstances under which an abortion is lawful in Ireland. The Bill’s conscientious objection provision reflects the limited development of ethical thought, debate and education in Ireland.

Continue reading “Shifting Sands: Absolutism to Relativism in Irish Medical Ethics”

Ethics and Society Newsfeed: May 29th 2013

Three-Parent Embryos: Mitochondrial Transfer IVF is Worth Pursuing 
Even though it is technically possible to create an embryo using the genetic material of three parents, is it ethically desirable?

The Abortion Issue Returns
With the Supreme Court hearing cases on various contentious issues, they are likely to return to one of their most enduring controversies: abortion.
Continue reading “Ethics and Society Newsfeed: May 29th 2013”

Getting Clear on Rights and Rules: The Intersection of Law and Philosophy

Michael Baur is a philosopher-lawyer who uses his double expertise to study social ontology.   Photo by Bruce Gilbert
Michael Baur is a philosopher-lawyer who uses his double expertise to study social ontology.
Photo by Bruce Gilbert

By Joanna Klimaski

If a tree falls on you in the woods and nobody sees it, have you been wronged?

You might have been harmed, but you would probably not accuse the tree of violating your human rights by falling over and crushing you. Unless, that is, you believe that rights are non-relational—then you might have some trouble getting the tree off the hook.

Continue reading “Getting Clear on Rights and Rules: The Intersection of Law and Philosophy”